sugar absent in recipe

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by franklin159753, Jul 20, 2020.

  1. franklin159753

    franklin159753 New Member

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    Hi,

    i'd like to give it a try at my first brew. however, on the recipe, sugar is absent, as is syrup.

    do i need to add generic sugar for fermentation ? if so, how much ?


    silly question i guess, but i just don't know...


    thx
     
  2. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    The sugar will come from the malted grain, or from malt extract.
    Can you share your recipe? I'm sure you will get a lot of helpful advice that way ;)
    And Welcome!
     
  3. franklin159753

    franklin159753 New Member

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    basically i have several recipe but i can't order everything i need for a specific one, waiting for stock to be refurbish...

    this one for example :
    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/855070/witbier-13-07-19

    or this one :
    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/731174/cream-ale


    you say sugar in the cereals, but what are syrup used for ? for the chimnay clone i have to use some, and can't find it available at the present apart at ridiculous prices (I'm in Europe)

    some guy add several "pellet" of sugar in the bottle before putting the caps, should i do the same or it's just to get a more alocoholic beverage ?


    thanks for any help !
     
  4. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to Brewers Friend Franklin, yes, please share your recipe, lots of helpful people here. As @Zambezi Special states the fermentable sugars will either come from malt extract, or frame mashing your grains in the correct temperature range.
     
  5. franklin159753

    franklin159753 New Member

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    so i don't have to add sugar ?

    what is the use of syrup also ? i thought it was actually to increase sugar hence alcohol
     
  6. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    Those recipes use grain, and not syrup or sugar. Do you have a set up for mashing with grain?
     
  7. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    If you don't have a way to use grain, you will want to find an "extract" recipe, the kind that uses malt extract.

    Many recipes use some grains for color and flavor, and malt extract for the base. If you are brand-new to brewing, I assume you want a recipe made from malt extract, so those recipes you have in your link will not do.

    One like this would be more suitable: https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/744905/17-days-smash-beer-
     
  8. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    If you are new to brewing beer, you should take some time to look over the following illustrated tutorial on this forum.
    It is not uncommon to add a "simple sugar" to a recipe, but there are reasons for doing so which you will come to learn in time.
    So as not to get discouraged with your first attempt, I would recommend you do two things.

    1) take some time to learn about the process, the tutorial below is a great place to start
    2) purchase an extract kit for your first brew, this will give you a tried and true recipe, and instructions as well

    Brewers Friend Illustrated Tutorial
    https://www.brewersfriend.com/forum/threads/beginners-brewing-illustrated-tutorial.10627/

    Here is a suggestion for a 5 gallon starter kit:
    https://www.northernbrewer.com/products/brew-share-enjoy-homebrew-starter-kit

    There are plenty of starter kits out there, this looks like the kit I started with 2-1/2 years ago.
    I still use most of what came with that kit today.

    Good luck, Cheers
    Craigerrr
     
  9. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    Where in Europe are you?
    That's just me being nosy, but might be helpful to know as membersvfrom the same country may be able to help with what ingredients are available where ;)

    And what do you have available in pots, pans, fermentation buckets etc.
    I'm sure we can come up with a good recipe.
    And what style of beer do you like? Also an important one :)
     
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  10. Rudibrew

    Rudibrew Active Member

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    Let us know your ingredients,then we can help u much better
     
  11. franklin159753

    franklin159753 New Member

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    basically i bought tank to "cook" the grain, i though about classic kitchen kit but didn't think dealing with temperature would be easy.

    i have also fermenting tanks to let the whole thing ferment.

    what i need to do i buy crushed grain to allow more sugar to escape during boiling then ? and this sugar should be enough ? Some guy add suger to each bottle, you do it only for higher alcohol if you feel like it or is it required ?

    i live in France, but making beer doesn't seem to be well developed, drinking it ok, but to get grain and hops i am looking for i am using a dutch seller, braumarkt, who seem to have most of what i need.
     
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  12. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    Yep, Braumarkt have a good assortment. I use them often (I'm Dutch).
    For the others: this is their website in English: https://www.braumarkt.com/en/

    As for the sugar you saw people using: it sounds like that is the sugar that you put just before bottling. You do that for the carbonation. Basically, the fermentation is finished, the yeast has used all the sugars from the grain. You then give it a little sugar while bottling. The yeast uses this and produces CO2, which can't go anywhere, hence the bubbles is the beer ;)

    Sounds like you are set to do all grain. In that case, but either an all grain kit, or crushed grain/yeast & hop.
    For a first attempt, a kit sounds like a plan. Choose a style you like and check this page https://www.braumarkt.com/en/starter-kits/brewing-beer
    Good luck.

    There are a fair number of different Dutch and Belgian beer brew companies that will ship to France.....
     
  13. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    You really need to take some time to read the Illustrated Tutorial here to ge a good understanding of the process. Without a basic understanding of brewing beer, you are likely to be discouraged with the results. Maybe see if these brew shops offer kits with instructions to follow. Brewing is essentially cooking, there are a number of important steps to follow to get good results.
     
  14. franklin159753

    franklin159753 New Member

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    i've red it, just was unsure about sugar

    i'll give it a try with a simple recipe and see what happen
     
  15. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Adding sugar when bottling the beer creates a secondary fermentation which carbonates the beer. You need to calculate the correct amount of sugar at that time. If you don't add enough the beer will still be beer, but may not be as carbonated as you would like. If you add too much sugar, you can/will create bottle bombs. They will explode, and can be extremely dangerous, and needless to say, very messy. There is a calculator on this site to determine the correct amount of sugar. Yeast are living organisms, when eating sugar they generate, Co2. Depending on the temperature during fermentation, and at time of packaging, there will be some degree of dissolved Co2 in the beer, this is why using the calculator is important.
    Keep reading, and researching, there is much to learn!
     
  16. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I hate to ask this question but have you ever looked into the brewing process? You do not boil the grains to release sugars, you mash the grains - steep them in water at about 67 degrees C for about an hour. Boiling only concentrates them. It seems you should look into the illustrated tutorial on this site before starting brewing. Happy to answer your questions and I think your brewing experience will be much better if you learn a bit about it before diving in.
     
  17. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Here is a link to the free online version of John Palmers book, How to Brew. It is a bit of a dry scientific read, but it is also probably the best learning tool available.
    I strongly recommend that you start with a kit, preferably an extract kit. Extract is a great way to brew beer, and you can make some excellent brews with it. Essentially with extract, someone has already mashed the grains, so that is a part of the process that you don't need to be concerned about. Get a kit, follow the instructions, and start learning!
     
  18. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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  19. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    @nosy, I think the cooking of grain may just be semantics as it is between inverted comma's

    @franklin: can you show a picture of your set up? Or show a link? Are you planning to do BIAB?

    If you scroll down on the second link I posted, you will find several all grain kits from "brouwbroeder" and "arsegan". They got the sets with fermenter and all, but also just the ingredients, without equipment.
    The reason why so many of us suggest starting like that is because all is already measured and complete, and it is generally a tried and tested recipe with instructions.
    You could buy all your own, but you will have left over grains and hops and no instructions (the recipes on most sites require you to know your equipment, efficiency etc).

    I've never brewed with extract (because it was not available) so I can't say anything about it.
     
  20. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I thought that as well as a possibility but wanted Franklin to be sure he knew what he was talking about - don't know if French for "Mashing" is "Cooking", might be since they're not that much of a beer culture. If I write in German I probably leave that impression as well....
     

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