something like guinness

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by brewmer, Oct 13, 2013.

  1. brewmer

    brewmer Member

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    Hi all
    My brother drinks guinness and cider and would like me to make him a keg of something like guinness, ive never made stout before, could you fine gents look at my recipe and make sure im not making tar.

    http://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/r ... guinn-ish-

    cheers
    lee
     
  2. MrBIP

    MrBIP Active Member

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    I'm certainly not the one to be offering recipe suggestions ("young" brewer here), but I did some google searching on this and found: http://www.cornykeg.com/store.asp?pid=31345

    This was the second place that included the souring of two bottles of Guinness, thought that was interesting.

    Good luck with it,

    MrBIP
     
  3. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Here's a recipe from Best of Brew 250 Classic Clone Recipes:

    5 Lbs English 2-row pale ale
    2.5 Lbs flaked barley
    1.0 Lbs roasted barley

    2.4 Oz East Kent Goldings (12 AAU) @ 60 mins

    Wyeast 1084 (Irish Ale)
    2 Qt yeast starter

    0.75 C Corn Sugar (priming)

    Problem is Guinness blends their beer with old (stale) beer to get the classic sour flavor.

    Good luck with it!
     
  4. brewmer

    brewmer Member

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    Thanks guys for your input, ive been looking at a few recipes one did have a can of stale guinness soured for 2 days, then added to the boil 15 mins, think im going to do a recipe without the souring first then maybe brew it again and try it, need a good base recipe to start from..i just lost 3 hours of my life playing with the water calculator :lol: sw water havent got back to me about my water qualitys yet wondered about using highland spring from the shop?
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Is your water reasonably good to drink and is it not too incredibly hard? If so, then brew with it. If you're new to brewing, water chemistry is about the last thing to worry about. Concentrate on sanitation and learning your process, you'll do far better with that at this stage than worrying about the ppm of calcium ions.
     
  6. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    first of all the darker the beer the less you need to worry about water, unless its highly chlorinated then just use a campden tablet, most of the time dark beers like guinness turn out fine, a little thick or thin and bitter is all you need to worry about, too much roasted barley will really get the burnt flavor on the mouth so be careful, the most you need to worry about is the amount of gravity vs particles in the beer, in most cases just keep it in the fermenter longer than normal and don't add corn sugar and you'll be fine
     
  7. brewmer

    brewmer Member

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    Thanks for your advice ,ill go with it and give it a go my water at home is quite soft, does the recipe look ok ?ive been told to use less than 10 % for roasted malts and 15- 20 flaked and 70 %pale..
    what would be the best mash temperature for a stout ?
     
  8. cearum

    cearum Member

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    Here is the recipe I used the last time. It's the same one that's posted above, but it's all filled out with some small additions; I added some acid malt to the mix. It created some of that "twang" but not as much as I would have liked so I updated it to an increased amount. I also found out my thermometer was off so my temperatures were off and turned out pretty sweet (mashed high). I'd do it again with the temperatures listed in my recipe.

    http://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/36824/dry-stout-guinness-clone-
     
  9. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I wonder what would happen if you took a portion of the wort out, say a quart to a half-gallon, sour mashed it by pitching a few grains of malt into the sample and holding it at 90° for about 18-24 hours, boiled the sample to kill off the bacteria, cooled it and returned it to the beer for fermentation? That would give you some sourness and some funky flavor not available through the use of food-grade lactic acid.
     
  10. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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  11. brewmer

    brewmer Member

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    Thanks everyone, so long as im not too far off track ill give it a bash, if its good ill run a mixed gas tap on my kegerator, my tastes are a bit whimpy when it comes to stout, big russian imperials im not too keen on, a bit too stout for me..looking for a guinness like draught not old style bottled guinness..

    Thanks for helps
     
  12. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    just a tip if you want a little sourness you can add cluster hops
     
  13. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    But from my experience, unless you want subtle notes of used kitty litter, use the cluster as a bittering hop only!
     
  14. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    in a dark stout it will have just a hint of sourness and be mostly drowned out by the roasted grains, just use a 1/4 to 1/2 ounce at 20
     
  15. brewmer

    brewmer Member

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    yeasties ordered, picked up my grain today localy from tuckers maltings (thanks to whoever sugested this great local supplier) im very excited to have another brew day when my yeasts are done. 2 kegs full untill november 5th party :lol: , one in secondary for another 2 weeks(my first belgian) and i have 2 fermenters free for something different, so after my brothers dry stout i want to try an amber/golden,malty hoppy ale similar to spitfire..
     
  16. Foster82

    Foster82 New Member

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    Remember darker grains will generally produce a beer with a higher FG, because some of the sugars have been caramelized. So as you increase the darker grains you might want to consider reducing you mash temp as a general rule, if you want a dryer beer. For your beer I would try and mash between 65-66 c if you want attenuation in the low 70's. If you get above 67 c 70% attenuation might be hard to achieve. Looks like the recipe is using 66 c which should be just about right.
     
  17. brewmer

    brewmer Member

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    Thanks for helps, i ended up with wlp004 for my yeasts the wyeast ones had shorter dates, i have some bullion and ekg hops to use up, starting yeast sunday for a brew during the week, mash is going to be roughly 70/20/10% marris/flaked/roast mashed at 66c
    cheers all will post the outcome...
     
  18. brewmer

    brewmer Member

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    Had a crack at this recipe today http://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/r ... dark-irish everything went to plan apart from a degree or 2 low on the last 20min sparge.
    overall think it all went well, took me 5½- 6 hrs. i ended up with 21ltrs in fermentor rather than 23 but gravity is 1.050 instead of 1.048, last time i topped up thinking i was low and ended up with a couple ltrs over so this time i left it as is,im sure i can practise this and fine tune things.
    The roasted malt gave me the colour i wanted and smelt nice and toasty and the samples tasted toasty and sweet, 45 ltr cooler only lost 1 degree in 60 mins again overall im a happy chappy, cant wait till next time

    cheers for all the advice guys :D
    lee
     
  19. brewmer

    brewmer Member

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    well morning after brewday there was a good bit of airlock activity, after 2 days it stopped, worried my temps were a bit low at 15.4 c ambient air temp so i took a sample today at 4 days and gravity was 1.014. sample tasted nice, roasty and creamy i ended up drinking the whole sample it has a nice creamy finnish.. how long would you guys recommend leaving this in primary,should i rack it once or keg straight from primary?
    thanks in advance
    lee
     
  20. LarryBrewer

    LarryBrewer Active Member

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    I'd let it go at least 14 days in the primary, then keg.
     

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