Smithwick's Irish Red Clone feedback

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by BarbarianBrewer, Feb 19, 2020.

  1. BarbarianBrewer

    BarbarianBrewer Well-Known Member

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    #1 BarbarianBrewer, Feb 19, 2020
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2020
    I was looking around for a new Irish Red AG recipe and targeted a Smithwick's Clone. Jake's recipe (https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/409293/jake-s-smithwicks-clone) looked pretty good.

    I made a couple of significant changes that I would like to get feedback on.

    1) I'm not anal about the style guidelines, but, the SRM on the original recipe is 25 and the style guide tops out at 14. It has 16 oz 140L Crystal, 4 oz 425L Chocolate & 4 oz 550 Roasted Barley.
    My question is what should I reduce or eliminate to put the color in the ballpark? Or just go with it, as is, for the first brew? That is my default but, this is so far out I'm questioning whether I should modify it.
    (Note: Amounts are after scaling up the recipe from 5.5 gal to 7.5 gal)

    2) I removed 1 oz Fuggles at 60 min and replaced with 1 oz Willamette at 60 and 0.75 oz EKG at 15 minutes (mainly because I already have Willamette & EKG in the freezer. I've never brewed with Fuggles so I don't know what flavor difference this will have.

    This is my revised recipe: https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/951393/smithwicks-clone
    [Edited to correct recipe urls]
     
  2. Iliff Avenue Brewhouse

    Iliff Avenue Brewhouse Well-Known Member

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    I see the SRM as 15.4. On my system 14-16 SRM usually gets me right where I want to be for a "red" colored beer. Your link has a permission error because you didn't share it.
     
  3. BarbarianBrewer

    BarbarianBrewer Well-Known Member

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    I corrected both urls in the original post. I had copied my recipe url while I was still editing the recipe. That's why that didn't work. The url for the original recipe was wrong because.....well, I'm an idiot or, at the very least, suck at multi-tasking and proof-reading :confused:
     
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  4. Iliff Avenue Brewhouse

    Iliff Avenue Brewhouse Well-Known Member

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    #4 Iliff Avenue Brewhouse, Feb 20, 2020
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2020
    personally, I would drop the brown malt and possibly the chocolate malt. Not sure where that will put you colorwise but if you are still too dark I would use a lighter crystal malt. If you are too light just add RB an oz at a time.

    Also I would shoot for IBUs at or above 20

    This would be my approach but I prefer simplicity most of the time:
    14.5# Marris Otter
    1# crystal 90
    2 oz roasted barley

    This will get you to 14-15 SRM. Remember that any roasted malt is mostly for color and perhaps a bit of added complexity.
     
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  5. BarbarianBrewer

    BarbarianBrewer Well-Known Member

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    @Iliff Avenue Brewhouse, I took your suggestion and dropped the brown and chocolate malts.
    14 # Maris Otter
    1# dark crystal #80
    4 oz roasted barley

    I used dark crystal #80 because I liked roastiness of that a little more than the crystal #90. The color was just outside Irish Red range at 16.6 SRM. Sampled the post boil gravity sample and it tasted a little sweet. But won't really know until after fermentation & conditioning. I'll keep you posted.
     

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