Small Batch Brewing..

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Curly73, Dec 18, 2018.

  1. Curly73

    Curly73 New Member

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    New to site and haven't brewed in years. I will be doing small batch brewing in the size of 1 gallon to 3 gallon on my stovetop as a Biab style. With that being said, how do I scale down recipes from 5 gallon recipes to 1 to 3 gallon? if that's even possible on here. sorry if this is dumb question but looking around for an hour and cant find anything on this. thanks
     
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  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    first welcome to the site
    copy the recipe, go to edit mode, top bar recipe tools, scale, new batch size
     
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  3. Curly73

    Curly73 New Member

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    wow that was easy. thanks for your help Ozarks mountain brew !!
     
  4. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    We live to assist. I need to try it myself, I want to make some experimental brews but I don't want to make a full kegs worth.
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I've found three gallons to be a great size for experimentals. That way I have enough to try, not so much that I can't dump it, and can see how it ages. I do some one-gallon extract batches to test ingredients but that's not what we're talking about in this thread.
     
  6. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

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    on the contrary to this, I do 2.5 gallon batches that fit excellently in 3 gallon glass carboys, and then cold crashing and fining lead to a yield of about 2.25 gallons, ideal for small batches in the 2.6 gallon torpedo ball lock kegs.
     
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  7. Curly73

    Curly73 New Member

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    this sounds like the set up I will be needing.
    that sounds like the route I want to take. I will be looking into the torpedo ball lock keg also. I have always bottled. I will be trying to brew over Christmas and New Years.
     
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  8. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

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    in my experience from using an electric coil stove when I started, to using an all in one electric brew kettle now, they both have a typical boil rate of 3 quarts per hour.

    You can do BIAB full volume mashes, and if you squeeze the bag you can expect about 1 quart of losses to absorption. If you need to sparge to hit your boil size, do so. I always aim for a 3 gallon (12 quart) boil size, boil it down over the course of 1 hour to 2.25 gallons (9 quarts), and then I pitch 1 quart of starter or rehydrated yeast into the carboy to hit 2.5 gallons (10 quarts). Hope this helps.

    https://www.morebeer.com/products/torpedo-ball-lock-kegs.html
     

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