Size of Fermentor?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by jmcnamara, May 11, 2016.

  1. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    I was at a brewery recently, and one of the brewers mentioned that larger tanks can actually ferment quicker. Something to do with the heat generated from the yeast cause currents in the wort to form. or something like that, i had already sampled a few pints by that point.

    Granted, they had giant steel conicals, so it may be different on a homebrew scale. but has anyone noticed this?

    assuming you control for all other variables, does this even make sense from a physics or thermodynamics standpoint?
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    I ferment all batches in a 13 gallon fermenter, 5 or 10 gallon and seems to me the 5 gallon likes it better, more room for growth and more oxygen in the head space I guess
     
  3. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    I do know that commercial brewers are able to ferment and have a finished product faster than I can at home. They also ferment warmer than I would at home. I think the warmth helps ferment faster. Apparently the larger batch allows for a warmer ferment to be possible without giving off too many off flavors.

    I don't understand all the physics but there is some currents formed during fermentation too. Bigger batch, bigger currents would sound reasonable.
     
  4. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    Funny that you mention this, I have had a very small batch, 1.5g in a 2g fermenter and noticed that it has been staying at the low end Of my temp range and warming up to my high end. Usually it is the other way around when I have 5.5g in a 7.5g fermenter. Next time I make a 2g batch I'll put it in a 5g bucket and see what happens.
     
  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    I ferment at 60 then ramp up to eventually 70 after 7 days, so 7 to 10 is just getting that last bit of alcohol out, sometimes Ill rouse the yeast at 7 days too
     
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    My first choice for a fermentor is my 8-gallon Speidel. I use a temperature probe through the lid directly into the beer to control fermentation temperature and it works like a charm! Option 2 would be a large bucket, shared with SWAMBO's wine production processes. As a last option, a 6-gallon carboy with a blow-off tube. Using the direct temperature control has been the best improvement to my beer in some time - I control within +/- 1 degree Fahrenheit. I also start fermentation cool then warm the beer over time - not only does it get the last bit of "dryness" into the beer but it takes out any remaining diacetyl.
     

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