Removing Trub from the bottle?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Topkick, Jan 24, 2016.

  1. Topkick

    Topkick New Member

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    Hi all,

    I am new to brewing and only doing small batch extract brew at this time. I am trying to remove the trub from the bottle, so far I have done the following:

    Cold Crash
    Bottling Bucket

    What else can you recommend to remove the sediment from the bottle without ruining the beer?

    Thanks,
    Joe
     
  2. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    You're always going to have a small amount of sediment in your bottle when homebrewing. Mostly it's yeast that hasn't settled out of the beer yet. Unless you filter with an extremely small screen, the yeast will always be present. And if you bottle, that's not an option, anyway. You need the yeast for your priming sugar. As a rule, homebrewers never filter like that. It's more trouble than it's worth.

    Even some commercial beers advertise that there is still yeast present in their beer. As a bonus, you could cultivate it, and use the exact same yeast they use.
     
  3. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

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    if you only bottle and you carbonate in the bottle its always going to have something in the bottom, best thing to do is pour it in a glass before drinking and leave a litte behind
     
  4. Topkick

    Topkick New Member

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    Thank you for the info, that was what I was thinking, but I had to ask. I do poor it into a glass, but I thought just thought maybe there was something else.

    Joe
     
  5. GernBlanston

    GernBlanston New Member

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    Even when you keg a beer and then bottle from the keg, there can be some sediment in the bottle if it sits for a while. A careful pour is still your best option.
     
  6. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    A few thoughts and things to look into

    1. TRy using some findings: Irish moss, gelatin, isinglass, etc. if you use anything in the kettle, you'll have to either autosiphon or pour very carefully to avoid transferring a lot of trub.

    2. Some people will disagree, but my clearer beers happen when I use a secondary. Oxidation and sanitation are something to be careful of, but I've never had a problem so far with it.

    3. Are you letting the fermentor settle overnight whenever you move it and before you transfer to the bottling bucket? Just moving it a bit will stir up everything inside, imagine lugging it across the room and up onto a countertop.

    For what it's worth, I just use the secondary now. No finings and no space to cold crash. To some degree, I think all 3 achieve the same goal (not necessarily equally though). Some just may be more effective given your space and equipment.

    And it pains me to say this, but sometimes you just gotta leave that last little bit in the bottle :cry:
     
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Consider that last bit a libation to the brewing gods. No matter how clear you get the beer short of filtering, there's some yeast in there. It will settle out. Cold-crashing, fining, no matter, you will get sediment in bottles of good beer. Be happy: The yeast in the bottle scavenge oxygen and help preserve your beer! So Ninkasi be praised, the last bit in the bottle is hers.
     

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