Quick question on over-carbonation in a keg -explenation needed

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by normanoslo, Jul 30, 2017.

  1. normanoslo

    normanoslo New Member

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    I just made my first beer in a keg. It is quite flat, even though I first used forced carbonation and then I let it stay on 14,5 psi for 2 weeks. In a different forum, they say this is because the beer is over-carbonated and that all this CO2 is released when I pour it into the glass.

    I thought over-carbonation would cause foaming, but it apparantly not not happen if you have a beer dispnser with a 2m long 3/8" tube.

    Can someone elaborate on this ? What happens? Is there something I can do to fix it?
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    over carbed beer will foam and it will have a bite to it, its really easy to taste since the bite outshines the flavor, you may have had a high pressure leak meaning it will only leak co2 when turned up high, I would purge the keg and tank turn down the pressure and hook it back up and leave it for a week at 12 psi, carbing slow will taste better anyway
     
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  3. normanoslo

    normanoslo New Member

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    [QUOTE=", I would purge the keg and tank turn down the pressure and hook it back up and leave it for a week at 12 psi, carbing slow will taste better anyway[/QUOTE]

    So I purge it, and then connect the gas at 12 psi right away? or purge it and wait an hour or so? I will try it.


    It is not foaming when pouring through my long tube and has no bite. So it seems not to be over-carbonated, then.

    A friend came over and tasted it. He commented the gas is there initially, but it then escapes after a fairly short time. Doesn´t this suggest it is over-carbonated? How can the gas escape ?
     
  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    what happens is a quick carb will add carbonation next to the molecules and will leave very quickly but a proper carbonation will bind with the molecules and stay in the beer, so it looks like you've carbed it but its just not done, so purge the keg turn down the pressure in the tank and purge the tank lines then hook back up at 12psi in that order
     
  5. normanoslo

    normanoslo New Member

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    #5 normanoslo, Jul 30, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2017
    "so purge the keg turn down the pressure in the tank and purge the tank lines then hook back up at 12psi in that order"

    ok, just to clarify: I vent it and then pressurize it to 12 psi and leave it for a week, or do I disconnect the CO2 line, vent it fully and connect it at 12 psi and leave it for a week?
     
  6. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    keep it connected, the reason I say this is the high pressure from your keg will send pressure back to your valve fooling your gage and giving you false readings, you want to vent all of the pressure out and hook back up and start over
     
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