Pilsner not fermenting

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by griz, Jan 7, 2015.

  1. griz

    griz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2015
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Greetings. I made a batch of Ngoma Togo Pils on Sunday (all grain). At the time of this post, there is little to no activity coming from the fermentation. I have the jug in a separate basement room where I can keep the tempt between 55-45, which the recipe calls for. I had the wort down to 60 degrees before adding yeast.

    I've read some posts that indicate due to the lower air tempts, fermentation will be slow and gradual. This is my first pilsner/lager brew, so not sure what to expect. Gravity ready prior to fermentation looked good.

    Any info/input would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. Brewer #40102

    Brewer #40102 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2014
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    What is the time between pithcing and this post?
    What yeast and how many did you add? I would say just give it some time.
     
  3. sbaclimber

    sbaclimber Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2012
    Messages:
    872
    Likes Received:
    340
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Germany
    ....and check your seals! I had one brew that hadn't started bubbling by the 3rd day...then I discovered the bucket wasn't sealed properly. Pushed the lid in place and *blub* *blub* *blub*. :lol:
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,415
    Likes Received:
    6,662
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    If you have krauesen, you have fermentation. If the "jug" is transparent, you can see it, a layer of foamy looking yeast on top of the beer; otherwise, you might pry a corner of the lid up to see if anything's working in there. As to airlocks bubbling, if you have krauesen and no bubbles, you're leaking gas somewhere. Sunday to Tuesday is about 48 hours - I've had lagers wait that long to start. Check for krauesen, check your equipment for leaks and then the yeast starts to come into question.
     
  5. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    961
    Likes Received:
    578
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Mentor, Ohio
    Hmm,
    First lager?
    I'd have to say that it's more than likely that you under-pitched and there is a long lag phase going on.
    How much yeast did you pitch into how much volume and what was the OG?
    Brian
     
  6. griz

    griz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2015
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Thanks for all the replies and info. Ironically, right after I did my post, the beer began to ferment away...maybe it was a sensitive yeast or something else, but it's bubbling like it should. Hopefully it will taste good after the different fermentation processes. Thanks again.
     
  7. SwampWater

    SwampWater Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2013
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Cavan, Ontario, Canada
    My Helles in the fall had a lag time of 70 hours. It turned out fine though and I had trouble RAHAHB.
     
  8. SwampWater

    SwampWater Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2013
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Cavan, Ontario, Canada
    Brewed another Helles and it took 68 hrs. to see any bubbling. Don't know why my lagers take so long to get going, but the beer is fine. I make a big starter in 2-3 steps. WLP940, WLP833 and WLP830. All the same lag time. Pitched @ 46 F. If that the way it is, fine I guess.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white