Palmer's Water Calculation Spreadsheet

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Nosybear, Nov 16, 2015.

  1. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Hey, does anyone know which calculation of color (SRM) is used in Palmer's RO spreadsheet? There are three offered in the Recipe Builder and sometimes the numbers vary wildly.
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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  3. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I read through a few myself before posting.... I'm guessing it's the Morey calculation Palmer built the spreadsheet around. The three calculation options in the Recipe Builder are pretty close for the beer I'm currently brewing but for some, the three are way off each otehr. The advanced water calculator determines the RA but does not give the target range for the beer being brewed - that's why I use the spreadsheet (hint, developers, perhaps a target RA range and option to use RA to calculate salt and acid effects....).

    Thanks for the answer!
     
  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Yes, and it doesn't address the issue of adjusting water to ensure proper mash pH. I can attempt to duplicate a water profile using it or I can adjust water pH but to adjust mash pH, residual alkalinity is the factor I need to control. To do that, the calculator would have to calculate the range of residual alkalinity that will result in an acceptable mash pH (5.2-5.5) and display the value. It should then allow me to enter my target or default to the midrange so I can see what effect salt or acid additions are having. It already takes acidulated malt into account.

    Reproducing Munich's water supply may be interesting but I'm concerned with controlling my mash pH and RA is the best predictor of it.
     
  6. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    Ive messed around with other spread sheets, Bruin and easy water, I realize you building water from scratch now, Ive read plenty of people doing that on http://www.homebrewtalk.com, might want to get more in depth there, ask a question and you get at least 50 answers
     
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I'm not building from scratch. All I'm doing is modifying my tap water either through dilution, addition of salts or acids to reach an RA that stabilizes my mash pH within the appropriate range for the enzymes to work. Actually, building from scratch might be easier.
     
  8. UgliestLemming

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    I attempted to use Palmer's spreadsheet awhile back so my memory of it isn't great, but I definitely think Bru'n water is a powerful tool. This is the one I use, and I specifically focus on mash ph. Have you tried that for water?

    https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/
     

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