Now that I have temp control...

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Craigerrr, Nov 26, 2018.

  1. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    So I have added temperature control to my fermentation, and just put my third batch in the chamber yesterday. First batch I set at 67F, but there was a 3 degree tolerance in either direction so the temp fluctuated between 64 and 70. I changed the parameters for the second batch to one degree, so temp fluctuated between 66 and 68.

    So, now that I have control I wonder about changing temperature during fermentation. The answer no doubt depends on what yeast I am using, but I interested to hear some thoughts on this.
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    If you're using an Inkbird controller, set it to Celsius - the temperature fluctuation is tighter. Changing temperature: Like dry, fully attenuated beers? If so, let the beer's temperature rise on its own in the last third of fermentation. It depends on yeast but most of my beers benefit from the increase in temperature near the end of fermentation.
     
  3. philjohnwilliams

    philjohnwilliams Well-Known Member

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    I assume that you would want to change temp for a diacetyl rest, if so then you can do like Nosybear suggests and let it rise on its own. I have been using an Inkbird controller for about 2 years now and what I tend to do is keep the temp controlled for the first 10 days then let it rise for a few days then bottle.
     
  4. ChicoBrewer

    ChicoBrewer Well-Known Member

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    Just remember that if you live in Canadia and your fermentation rig is in the garage it probably wont rise on its own . .

    LOL
     
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  5. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    My rig is basically intended for summer months. I actually have to apply heat to keep things proper.
     
  6. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the responses, much appreciated. I took the time tonight to read the chapters on fermentation and yeast management in John Palmer's book. I now know enough to know that I don't know enough . I have however found my last two batches with temp controlled fermentation have been my best to date.
     
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  7. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I should go back and read the book my wife got me when I started. I am more of a hands on learner but reviewing it with existing knowledge could be interesting.
     
  8. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Taking into account all of the above advice, as well as what I am reading in "How to Brew". John Palmer suggests raising the temperature as much as 9F three days into fermentation for ales. I am at 67F currently, and the yeasts optimum temperature is listed as 65-69F. To raise it 9F would take it up to 76F, does that make sense. I am inclined to turn the temp up to 69F, and let it continue chugging away for at least another 5 or 6 days before taking a gravity sample.

    Thoughts?

    BTW Nosy, I will change the inkbird over to celcius after this batch.
     
  9. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    just set it to a degree lower than you want and it will be fine, mine is one degree up or down and the temp probe is in a thermal well and I keep track of it on my web site and the actual work never goes up or down the aire does so its fine
     
  10. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    If the majority of fermentation is done raising it 9f for the diacytl rest is fine. The yeast shouldn't throw many off flavors if they are only eating the last couple gravity points, and the higher temp should help them clean up the diacytl.
     

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