New to dry hopping

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Michael_biab, Mar 26, 2018.

  1. Michael_biab

    Michael_biab Member

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    I haven't dry hopped in a long long time, so essentially I'm considering myself new to it. Yesterday, I dry hopped my barleywine. It had been sitting in the secondary for about a month or so. It's now showing some action (bubbling near the surface, see picture attached) although I don't see much movement in their airlock. Is this normal for those of you who are more familiar with dry hopping? Should I proceed to allow the hops to be in contact with the beer for another 5 days as called for in the recipe? Any other advice? Thanks!
     

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  2. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    It looks fine to me. You're going to have a ton of fun getting that hop sock out of the carboy though.
     
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  3. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I rack the beer, then pull the sock out. It's still the challenge but if the sock burst, I don't contaminate the beer.
     
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  4. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    Its just a bit of co2 coming out of solution. Nothing to worry about.
     
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  5. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely. This is pretty common to see what looks like fermentation starting up. The vast majority of my pale ale and IPA's do this and I just ignore it. The beer hit it's target gravity, so the beer is de-gassing because of nucleation. The small hop bits create a sharp point for the CO2 to form. This is especially true if the beer is cool (55-60F).
     
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  6. thehaze

    thehaze Active Member

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    Everything said above is on point, so no need to worry. Brew on!
     
  7. Michael_biab

    Michael_biab Member

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    Thanks everyone! Glad to know it's all ok. Now, if I could just stop over/undershooting my target gravity. This started out as an American IPA (1.068) but will end up closer to 1.080 or something approaching a Barley Wine. Oops!
     
  8. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    You're in good... well my company anyway in your tendency to overshoot.
     

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