Mash & Collect Wort Today...Boil Tomorrow

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by vthokiedsp, Sep 23, 2018.

  1. vthokiedsp

    vthokiedsp Member

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    Did some research online and saw a pretty split crowd on this topic so I figured I'd post here for your thoughts.

    Any issues with collecting all of my wort one day and then boil the following day? I wouldn't refrigerate either. I'd put the wort in my basement that is currently 68 deg F. I used a regular batch method. Mash at 153 deg F and sparge at 168 deg F.

    I've done this on my last two batches (saison & pale) bc it's easier to manage with my family schedule and haven't noticed any ill effects. The reason i'm asking this time is that this upcoming brew is a pumpkin brew and is on the pricier side. i wouldn't want to get to bottling day to find that i've wasted a lot of money on vanilla, spices, etc.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    This is just my .02.
    If you can't afford failure. Why risk it?
     
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  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    #3 J A, Sep 23, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2018
    You don't mention, but are you just letting it cool from mash-out temp overnight? I'd say that eventually, you'll get soured wort that way, given that you still have plenty of lactobacillus from the malt. That's sort of how kettle sours are made. ;)
    At the minimum, I'd raise it to 170 for a bit to sterilize it. Maybe you have a much cooler, less microbe-friendly environment than I do here in Texas, but I don't risk anything for more than a few hours between sparge and boil occasionally.
     
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  4. vthokiedsp

    vthokiedsp Member

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    Previous times, i just put the lid on, added Saran wrap to seal it, and let it sit in the porch for a day. could cool quickly with my immersion chiller or hit with a bit of heat to pasteurize. Not sure which would be better.
     
  5. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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    Have only done similar when really pushed for time .
    In my case I reached boil then racked off to a clean, sterile no chill cube.
    On upside I was able to clean element in kettle between uses .
    If you have a ph meter I'd take readings to measure any change
     
  6. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Boiling again should kill off any wild bacteria but as above you may have a souring risk.
     
  7. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    If the mash were done above 145F (63C) it would effectively pasteurize the wort. Lacobacillus naturally occurring on the malt would be for the most part dead, along with wild yeast and such. If the container holding the wort were sealed, there a good chance everything would be “totally fine”. If, on the other hand, it were exposed to microorganisms after the temperature dropped, you could have a problem. But like all organisms that infect beer/wort, it either needs a larger inoculation or time. If it were boil right away the next day, the risk would be reduced. But there is still a risk.
     
  8. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member

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    Timing ( in my weak mind) is important. I have done this often, but I fretted all night once when I mashed Thursday MORNING for a Friday boil. It turned out to not be an issue, but ever since I have done the mash right before going to sleep, and starting the boil as soon as possible the next morning. Never any ill effects in my experience
     
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