Low Attenuating Beer Styles

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by TheZel66, Jan 17, 2014.

  1. TheZel66

    TheZel66 Member

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    Beers such as Milk stouts call for original gravities around 1.050-55 and final gravities around 1.025-20. Anyone know a good way to get yeast to attenuate that low (ie, 55-60%) mine usually attenuate in the mid70s to low80s for percent attenuation...
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    add a sweetener to give the yeast more strait food like candy sugar or corn sugar even brown sugar
     
  3. Tom McLean

    Tom McLean New Member

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    Also, pick a yeast that has a low attenuation character. You get this from either the White or Wyeast web site. If you are doing an all grain beer, mash at 158 F.
     
  4. chessking

    chessking New Member

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    The reason A Milk stout has a higher FG is that the complex sugars from the higher mash temps, and the lactose in the recipe, do not ferment and leave a desired residual sweetness and mouth feel. Adding sugar may lower the FG some as it will increase the alcohol, effecting the hydrometer reading. If you want to keep the alcohol level the same and lower the FG, replace some of the fermentables with simple sugar, and/or eliminate the lactose addition. However your final beer will not be a milk stout. Residual sweetness and mouth feel/body are a requirement for a sweet stout style, and a higher FG the result.
    So you can dry out a milk stout if you want, my only question would be Why?
     
  5. chessking

    chessking New Member

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    Maybe I read your question wrong, and you are trying to get a higher FG. If that is the case, mash higher and add lactose. Be sure to use British yeast (WLP006 Bedford British, or Wyeast 1099 Whitbread Ale)
     
  6. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    BJCP says a sweet stout (milk stout) has og from 1.044-1.060 and FG of 1.012-1.024.They are called milk stouts because the addition of lactose for mouthfeel and sweetness. You all grain so mashing in at 158ish should help with this. Also there are several English and also Scottish yeasts that attenuate mid 60's to 70%. Looks like a combination of these should do the trick.
     
  7. TheZel66

    TheZel66 Member

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    Ok, alot missing the point... I'm asking that given that the OG is as low as 1.050-1.055, how do you keep the FG at 1.020-1.025 (as in Mackeson XXX stout, the definitive style marker), a not have it go down to 1.008-1.012??
     
  8. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    oh I was lost your right :D --- less fermentables, or watch it and stop the fermentation at that point, so instead of 2 weeks fermenting try 1, although if you did that, might need to condition longer, those types of beer need more time
     
  9. Foster82

    Foster82 New Member

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    Like said before mash at a higher temp, which will result in a higher number of unfermentable sugars. Additionally increasing the amount of dark grains (your darker crystals and such) will also contribute to the unfermentable sugar count, because the sugar extracted from these grain are caramelized which the yeast can't use. Couple the high mash temp, caramelized grains, and a yeast with a low attenuation (WLP002), getting a brew with attenuation in the low 60s to high 50s to completely achievable. Although lactose does make getting a low attenuation much easier, but is not required.
     

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