Looking for some help with recipe adjustments

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Zambezi Special, Mar 18, 2019.

  1. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    I have finally decided on a base recipe, well actually on 2 of them.
    I am now going to have to adjust them to my situation, with new equipment. I realise that will mean quite a bit of fine-tuning later on:

    Method: BiaB, full volume (no sparge)
    Kettle size: 30 liter and I want to make a 10 liter batch
    I'll have to mill my own malt and I want to mill it quite fine
    Changing the amounts is relatively easy, deciding on mash time and mash temperature isn't.
    Deciding on how much water to start off with is also a bit of a gamble.

    I have done one small batch, following the instructions that came with it.
    It was a 7 liter batch, starting with bringing 5 liter water for mashing and 4 liter hot water for sparging.
    I ended up at about 5.5 liter wort as I didn't manage to drain all liquid out of the grains. I then topped up to 6 liter with ice, as I thought that maybe filling to 7 would make the beer too light
    I figure I could have had another 0.5-1.0 liter if I would have done things right (drained the grain in a colander over the kettle, but the colander was sitting to deep, so when sparging, the grainbag couldn't drain properly)
    So, I used 9 liter water to come to 6 liter wort, if I would have drained properly.

    Sooo, I am thinking of starting my 10 liter batch with 13 liter water as it is easier to add water than removing it.

    Mash duration: 60 or 90 minutes?

    Mash temperature?
    I would like to do a one temperature mash. Around 66-67 oC?
    Then when the time is finished, I'll pull up the bag, let it drain into the pot and heat through to boiling?

    The recipes are as follows:
    Westmalle extra: https://www.hobbybrouwen.nl/forum/index.php/topic,30778.0/all.html

    Beer type Bitter blond
    Volume 27,0 l
    start SG 1,047 SG
    calculated colour (Morey) 7 EBC
    calculated bitternes (Tinseth) 31 IBU
    efficiency 75,0 %
    boiling duration: 90 min.

    24,50 l Water
    12,17 l sparge water

    5,595 kg Pilsner malt , Dingemans, 3 EBC, 100,0 %:
    Mine will be either of these
    https://www.beerlab.co.za/collections/grains/products/waltslagermalt
    https://www.beerlab.co.za/collections/grains/products/waltspilsnermalt

    Mash schedule
    Amylase rest 64,0 °C / 1 min step, 75 min duration. thickness (?) 4,4 l/kg
    Mash out 78,0 °C /10 min step. 10 min duration . thickness 4,4 l/kg

    Hop
    53,3 g Saaz pellets 3,4% first wort hop 21,7 IBU
    74,0 g Saaz pellets 3,4% 10 min. 9,3 IBU

    yeast
    1,0 packTrappist High Gravity (3787)
    I have been advised to use Mangrove Jack M47 (as I want to use a dry yeast)

    The other recipe:
    https://www.roerstok.nl/recepten?id=290

    (the same remarks apply about malt choice and yeast type)
    beer type: blond

    Pilsner malt (3 EBC) 2500 gram 3 EBC
    Pale malt (7 EBC) 450 gram 7 EBC

    Hallertau 25 gram , 90 min. 5 α
    Saaz hop 10 gram, 10 min. 4 α

    Wyeast 1187 Ringwood Ale

    Mash schedule
    53 °C - 15 minutes
    63 oC - 30 minutes
    72 oC - 20 minutes
    78 oC - 5 minutes
    batch size 10 liter

    boiling time : 0 minutes
    start SG: 1063
    end SG: 1018
    EBU (bitterness): 25.0

    Sorry for the very long post and I hope the recipes are more or less readable.
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I'd go with the Blond. The Westmalle is rather ambitious for a beginner.
     
  3. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    That was my first response, but it's actually not the case here.
    It's a Westmalle extra, which I thought would be a tripel, extra strong, but it is actually a blonde. The people that gave me the recipe mention an alcohol percentage of about 5%.
    If you look at the recipe, it's fairly simple: 1 malt/1 hop
    I just need to see what to do with the mash schedule (the original of the other recipe has a much more complicated mash schedule...)
    And whether to boil 1 hour or 90 minutes
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I boil 90 minutes for a little more kettle caramelization (Maillard reactions, actually). The "ambitious" part is fermentation control. I remember you saying something about having difficulty cooling wort and assumed you may not be able to control fermentation temperature. But Belgian yeasts like it hot so you may be good with this. Give it a shot!
     
  5. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    Ah, I now see why....
    But yes, the yeasts I have, can all handle a slightly higher temperature.
    Sofar, I have only done one batch of 7 liters and I managed to cool it down to 26-27 oC without too many problems. It shouldn't be much different with a 10 liter batch. By the time I am brewing it, it will be colder outside (cold being a big word around here).
    I do have a fridge with temperature control.

    So 90 minute boil.
    And what about the mash temperature and duration?
     
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    For a Belgian blond with no adjunct sugars, pretty low. Around or below 65° C. Try to keep the fermentation temperature below 25° C to control the yeast-derived phenols.
     

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