Lallemand Abbaye Dry Yeast

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Frankenbrewer, Jul 21, 2020.

  1. Frankenbrewer

    Frankenbrewer Well-Known Member

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    Anyone ever use this yeast? It took about 24 hours to get going (pitched last Friday) now there's been no change in SG (using Tilt Hydrometer) since yesterday. Perhaps I have raised the temp too soon? I shouldn't need to pitch more yeast since I used 11g pack for 2.5 gal batch.
     
  2. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

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    Never used it, but...

    What temp did you pitch at, ferment at, and then raise to?
    What was the OG and what is the current gravity reading?
     
  3. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    I did a couple of Belgian singles with that a few years ago. They were just small 5 litre batches, probably pitched the whole sachet. Fermented out in 4-5 days, 1.045/1.055 to around 1.01. No real problem with them, esters were a bit big so I tried liquid for the next few attempts at the single.

    First batch I didn't have temp control, but it got hot and I cooled it down with a wet tshirt. Second I didn't apply any heat until it was basically done. Surprisingly I kept decent notes, wouldn't have remembered any of this.
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    It's worked well for me in the past. What temp did you pitch and how did you aerate?
     
  5. Herm_brews

    Herm_brews Well-Known Member

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    I recently used Lallemand LalBrew Abbaye Belgian Style Ale Yeast for the first time. As directed on the package, I rehydrated the yeast, and it blossomed, Fermentation activity was noticed within a few hours of pitching, but nothing really vigorous. Activity seemed to slow down rather quickly, with very little krausen, such that I wondered if I had a stalled/stuck fermentation. At nearly 3 weeks in primary fermentation, I bottled (as is my custom), and according to my refractometer reading, final gravity was 1.012 (recipe based estimate was 1.013). So apparently, the yeast did it’s work with little fanfare. I will sample the conditioned beer the weekend after next.
     
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  6. Frankenbrewer

    Frankenbrewer Well-Known Member

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    2 hours after I posted this thread, it had dropped 2 points. It must be a slow roller. There's still activity in the airlock. Very faint but noticeable.
     
  7. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    I still have a belgian on tap with this yeast and the esters are big! It certainly isn't bad but it makes me like and appreciate my lagers even more. Something about the fruity notes (pears mostly) that I am just not in love with. I feel if I had gotten darker fruity notes like plums and raisins I would have liked it more. Mine too was a single.
     
  8. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    The "pear" notes you mention always come across to me as a pear that's been forgotten in the back of the fridge, not rotten but definitely beyond what you'd want to eat. I agree: Most "Belgians" I drink from American brewers come across as the kind dudes with overalls and great beers sip, nod knowingly, speak with great knowledge and wisdom about and when no one is looking, water the planter boxes with.
     
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  9. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    I feel like you just nailed it on head!
     
  10. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I finally managed to do what I'd consider to be a drinkable Belgian. I brewed to 7.5% ABV, used a pound of dark Candi Syrup to cut body and provide burnt sugar flavors, I fermented it cool (60 degrees, rising to 70 degrees by fermentation's end), used a blend of saison and lager yeast, kept the hopping reasonable and used no spices whatsoever. It has a banana-toasted marshmallow flavor, isn't harsh or phenolic, no "pepper" notes and I could pound that stuff. Key is restraint! The dudes in their overalls with great facial hair would likely sniff at it (and secretly order another pint) as "not Belgiany enough." It's perfectly Belgiany enough for me.

    Next up, a session Saison.
     
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  11. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    And the Belgian brewers would nod their head and mumble drinkability.
     
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  12. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I was trying to avoid the "D" word...
     
  13. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    Bit like the 'B' word?
     
  14. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Que?
     
  15. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    Balanced
     
  16. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    I feel I have to comevto the defence of Belgian beers ;)
    I love them, and Belgium is close to home (neighbouring country to where I was born and raised)...
    No idea what the Americans brew and consider Belgian though.
    Me, I love Westmalle, Leffe, De Koninck, Affligem etc etc, with a preference for Blonde and Tripel [cheers]
     
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  17. Frankenbrewer

    Frankenbrewer Well-Known Member

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    I started drinking Belgian beers 20 years ago. Leffe is one of my favorites. I got away from them because I got into IPAs and all of the Belgian beers reduced the bottle size and increased the cost. Now that I'm brewing beers, I want to get back to drinking Belgian styles again.
     
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  18. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I can't stand the flavour of banana in most things, including beer so I am fairly picky about what kind of belgian beers I actually like.
     
  19. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Ah, that "B" word... Can't mention that one around an American brewer of Belgian styles, can we? Zambezi, American interpretations of Belgian beers tend to be out of balance, fermentation characteristics emphasized to the point of undrinkability. I tend to think the number one criteria for any beer is drinkability, I leave harsh and out of balance flavors to medicine and liquor (which I don't drink as a rule).
     
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  20. Herm_brews

    Herm_brews Well-Known Member

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    My wife and I just finished a long hike, so why not enjoy a home brew? I opened the first bottle of my BelWit, fermented with LalBrew Abbaye Belgian Style Ale yeast. With only one week of conditioning, the head is a little thin, but the beer effervescent and hazy. There is a touch of citrus, and subtle spicy fruitiness. It seems balanced. This is a pretty good, refreshing beer, in my opinion. It might deserve another brew - we’ll see how it goes as the rest continue to condition.
     

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