Kettle Size

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Nola_Brew, Jul 25, 2015.

  1. Nola_Brew

    Nola_Brew Active Member

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    I currently have a 2 gallon and 3 gallon kettle but looking to get a larger size. I'm still only doing 1 gallon batches but want to increase to 1.5-3 gallon BIAB soon.
    I'm looking at getting a 10 gallon kettle. At this point and probably looking 1-2 years down the road, I will probably not do any brews larger than 3 gallons.
    With that said, would a 10 gallon kettle be too big for 1.5-2 gallon batches? I want to get a big enough kettle just in case I do end up brewing 5 gallons down the road.
    From what I've read, a 10 gallon kettle is sufficient for 5 gallon batches. Not sure if you can actually have too big a kettle but just wanted to ask before making a purchase.
     
  2. UgliestLemming

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    I do BIAB for batches between 2-3 gallons with a 10 gal kettle - the boil off is a bit much on 2 gallons, but if you plan for it, it would be fine I'm sure.
     
  3. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    I don't think a kettle can be too big for a batch, provided that the base isn't too big for its height. I think the smaller the diameter, the better. To a point, of course. The extra height would also help guard against boil overs.
     
  4. Nola_Brew

    Nola_Brew Active Member

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    Thanks. I was kinda figuring as much.
    My concern was the boil off but if I account for that then I should be fine. I was also concerned with the height to width ratio.
    The 7.5 gallon kettle is 14.25 W x 14T and the 10 gallon is 15.5W x 16.5T.
    What do you think the boil off rate would be for 1-2 gallon batches with a 10 gal kettle?
    I've been getting about .5 boil off with my 3 gallon kettle so I would think at least 1 gal/hr?
     
  5. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    Boil off depends on ambient temperature, humidity, and other variables. If it were me, I'd allow what you've experienced in the past, and make adjustments from there. It's easy to add water if you boiled off too much
     
  6. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    The bigger the diameter of the kettle, the more surface to boil off, my kettle is a 20 gallon and I boil
    off much more than my 10
     
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    For my small BIAB batches - generally tests - I use my old 5-gallon pot, the one from the old extract days. Gives me room to mash and boil in the same pot. Remember, for a three gallon batch you'll be boiling at least four gallons of wort, assuming you're doing a full boil. And I like enough room under the bag that I can apply direct heat if needed without melting the bag. Like most things brewing, there are many considerations and few simple answers.
     

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