Keg sediment

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by jeffpn, Aug 2, 2016.

  1. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    I always thought that any sediment that made it to the keg would come out early on. It doesn't seem to be happening for me. It's especially evident when I rouse a keg to see how close it is to being empty. I just poured quite a cloudy beer that yesterday (before rousing) was quite clear. Is this normal?
     
  2. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    yes
    Don't rouse it. Problem solved. :lol:
     
  3. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for that. My kegs didn't come with a dipstick.
     
  4. newmanwell

    newmanwell Active Member

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    Unless you're filtering there's probably not a way to get a sediment free keg. If I'm curious how much is left in a keg I just give it a very gentle lift.
     
  5. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    I swear I've read or heard somewhere, probably in Charlie P.'s book, that the sediment is the first thing to come out, and after that, it's all clear beer. That doesn't seem to be the case for me. I'm wondering what others experience.
     
  6. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    P. 329 of New Complete Joy c 1984, 1991 says a small amount of sediment will be drawn off with the first few glasses of beer - after that, it's clear aleing!

    I gues that doesn't preclude undisturbed sediment that stays behind. I just always assumed the beer would be sediment free after the first few glasses.
     
  7. newmanwell

    newmanwell Active Member

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    Every time I clean a keg, even if the beer coming from that keg was clear and bright, there is always some sediment in the areas away from the dip tube. So disturbing the keg likely moves the sediment towards the dip tube.
     
  8. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    Just cut your dip tube an inch off the bottom, works for me
     
  9. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    I've read lots of places where people do that. Not for me. This isn't a problem until the last couple glasses. As the keg gets going, it's amazing how clear it gets for most of it.
     
  10. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    That statement could go terribly wrong very quickly.... ;-)
     
  11. artbreu

    artbreu Member

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    I'll pile on the confirmations. You'll never get all of the sediment out, even if you fine with gelatin. First couple of brews will clear out a small area surrounding the dip tube. Once you disturb the keg, that cleared out area is now refilled with sediment, so avoid that.

    If you fine with gelatin you can clear the keg much quicker, but the first couple of beers are undrinkable (not harmful, but disgusting). Cheers!
     
  12. LlewellynBrewHaus

    LlewellynBrewHaus Active Member

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    But most kegs are owned by a dipstick ! hehehe :mrgreen: :lol:
     
  13. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    My intent for this thread was more observational than problem solving. I don't consider the sediment to be a problem, or something I need to deal with. I'm just wondering what others are seeing. I would like to thank my fellow dipsticks for replying! :D
     
  14. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    No dipsticks here, but I do have a bottling wand....
     
  15. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    there is always yeast in the bottom of my kegs, sometimes hops but Im shying away from using 3 pounds in a beer, its just not an every day choice for me
     
  16. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    This is one of the three I roused last night. That keg is nearly empty too. It will be interesting to see how much sediment is in it when I clean it.
     

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  17. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    If you don't filter, beer has sediment in it, period. If you secondary which If I remember correctly you do then that helps to minimize the sediment. The sediment settles to the bottom of the keg and around the dip tube will clear out quickly on the first few pours. If you move the keg around there is bound to be some sediment stirred up. When you clean a keg after use there is always some sediment left to flush out. When you bottle you handle the bottles very carefully, I suggest you do the same with the keg.
     
  18. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    It's fine, really. Period. Like I already said, I read where Charlie P said that the first couple beers will be cloudy. After that, clear beer. For twenty years, I assumed that all of the sediment comes out first when you keg. Doesn't seem to be the case. That's okay.
     
  19. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    yes but the longer the beer sits the more sediment appears, its just gravity doing its job, no such thing as a sediment free keg when empty, trust me Ive tried
     

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