Irish Stout - British Beerline

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Thurston Brewer, Nov 23, 2016.

  1. Thurston Brewer

    Thurston Brewer Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Sunny So Cal
    I'm dreaming up a line of UK/British style beers for my imaginary pub. First intallment for your perusal and comment:

    I like a nice Guinness, but my dream stout would be richer and fuller with raisiny tones to complement the roastiness. Dark caramel for body and flavor, CaraPils for body and head, EK Goldings cuz they're so damned British!

    Critique away!

    Irish Stout 01
    Dry Stout
    Recipe Specs
    ----------------
    Batch Size (G): 3.0
    Total Grain (lb): 7.500
    Total Hops (oz): 1.50
    Original Gravity (OG): 1.063 (°P): 15.4
    Final Gravity (FG): 1.018 (°P): 4.6
    Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 5.90 %
    Colour (SRM): 43.9 (EBC): 86.5
    Bitterness (IBU): 40.6 (Tinseth)
    Brewhouse Efficiency (%): 70
    Boil Time (Minutes): 60
    Grain Bill
    ----------------
    5.000 lb United Kingdom - Maris Otter Pale (66.67%)
    1.000 lb American - Caramel / Crystal 120L (13.33%)
    1.000 lb American - Carapils (Dextrine Malt) (13.33%)
    0.500 lb United Kingdom - Roasted Barley (6.67%)
    Hop Bill
    ----------------
    1.50 oz East Kent Goldings Pellet (5% Alpha) @ 60 Minutes (Boil) (0.5 oz/Gal)
    Misc Bill
    ----------------
    Single step Infusion at 156°F for 60 Minutes.
    Fermented at 68°F with Irish Ale Yeast WLP004
    Notes
    ----------------
    Estimated mash pH: 5.68
    High pH, temperature and inclusion of CaraPils should ensure good body
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,422
    Likes Received:
    9,480
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Maybe boil for 90 for more mailard reaction. I'm no stout man but I don't mind a Guinness myself. haven't got round to brewing one yet;)
     
    Thurston Brewer likes this.
  3. Thurston Brewer

    Thurston Brewer Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Sunny So Cal
    Yeah, sounds like a good suggestion! OK, easy to do...

    I'm wondering if I'm overdoing the body, though, with C120 + Carapils + high mash pH + high mash temp. Don't want to end up with too many unfermentables.
     
  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,976
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    in my experience but only with my beers one pound of Carapils is too much in a 5 gallon batch, I only use 1/2 pound and the reason is it adds alot of body to the beer and the mouth feel is off, for an English style this might be what your going for so if you've used it before in yours just disregard
     
  5. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,422
    Likes Received:
    9,480
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Yep it's a tough one thirsty have you got any other stout recipes for a comparison therefore giving indicators for amounts of crystal/carapils ect then you can sorta use these as a guideline? High mash temp to me is a given with full bodied British beer you don't want heavy attenuation from yeast so maybe carapils is the big ? What ever the case it's going to have some great head on it going 1 pound carapils I'm not sure what that is in Grams kilos but I use 100g with great results. Hay Llewellyn house brew has been using 10 lovibond crystal for head retention that's another avenue:rolleyes:
     
  6. Thurston Brewer

    Thurston Brewer Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Sunny So Cal
    Well, I've never used Carapils before, so I will take my cue from more experienced hands. 1 pound is about 454 kg so that's a lot more than TB uses... OMB suggests 1/2 lb for 5 gallons but I'm making a 3 gallon batch so that would come out to about 0.3 pounds.

    Somewhere in the 0.22 to 0.3 pound range for a 3 gallon batch... I think I'll compromise at 1/4 pound and compensate on the base malt end. I'll run the numbers and re-up the recipe later.

    Cheers!
     
  7. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,422
    Likes Received:
    9,480
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Once you go carapils you never go back;) I've not used a recipe lately without it always about 100-150g I've herd no more than 5% but you'll need to work that out for yourself. I did an golden promise brew where I put 500g of it in it and it was a sweet beer and attenuated to 1.020 I mashed high as well. No I'm not sure if it was yeast or over uSe of carapils or high mash temp Or all three.
     
  8. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,976
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    thats a good idea
     
  9. Thurston Brewer

    Thurston Brewer Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Sunny So Cal
    OK, I fixed up the grain bill:

    Grain Bill
    ----------------
    5.500 lb United Kingdom - Maris Otter Pale (78.57%)
    1.000 lb American - Caramel / Crystal 120L (14.29%)
    0.250 lb American - Carapils (Dextrine Malt) (3.57%)
    0.250 lb United Kingdom - Roasted Barley (3.57%)

    I cut the CaraPils by 3/4 lb, cut the Roast barley by 1/4 lb (got to thinking and realized it was likely to be too roasty and harsh), and I upped the Maris Otter by 1/2 lb to keep the OG in the ball park.

    I'm happier with this, now... That's what's so great about having forum budz to bounce these things off! :D
     
    Trialben likes this.
  10. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
    Have you heard of capping your mash with the super dark malts? From my experience, it gives a bit more rounder and less harsh roasted flavor
     
    Thurston Brewer likes this.
  11. Thurston Brewer

    Thurston Brewer Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Sunny So Cal
    No, sir, I haven't. Please do expound...
     
  12. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2012
    Messages:
    2,253
    Likes Received:
    2,451
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Back in the mountains
    I recently brewed a dry stout with the same ideas in mind of more without making it out of style. Not same recipe but close as far as balance. This should come out well for you. Brew On!
     
  13. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,887
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Master carpenter , all round good guy
    Location:
    Radelaide SA , Australia
    Capping the mash is just a simple job , add your dark roasted malts at mash out or with 10 mins or so left .
     
  14. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
    Yup. you're basically steeping the darker grains instead of mashing them that way
     
  15. Thurston Brewer

    Thurston Brewer Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Sunny So Cal
    Cool, thanks for the tip. I think I'll go with the traditional mash the first time as a baseline, and use this technique as a modification later as needed.

    Another tool in the belt...
     
  16. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,422
    Likes Received:
    9,480
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Something to do with astringent bitter dark malts eh?
     
  17. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,887
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Master carpenter , all round good guy
    Location:
    Radelaide SA , Australia
    That's the theory Ben , dark malts have no enzymes left anyway so a full mash just extracts extra harsh compounds and a little more colour

    Lucky I don't do much dark beer since my grains get sent fresh milled and bagged
     
  18. underdogsbrewery

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2016
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Roma
    Are you talking about a dry stout?
    In this case crystal malt should be avoided
     
  19. Thurston Brewer

    Thurston Brewer Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2016
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Sunny So Cal
    Not a dry stout per se, but not a sweet one, either. I'm aiming for something like Guinness with more body and mouthfeel, smoother (yet still bitter) but also with a richer flavor. I've always found Guinness to be lacking in those ways - personal preference, not judgment.

    For the richer flavor I wanted to add a raisiny note, and I've read in several sources that Crystal malts at higher Lovibond can provide such a flavor - that's primarily why I'm adding it. I don't want to end up with an undue amount of residual sweetness so I plan to let it ferment out longer than usual so the yeast has a chance to attenuate well. A little sweetness would be OK, but not like a sweet stout or a milk stout.

    The only remaining question, I guess, is whether the Irish Ale Yeast I've chosen is appropriate - in terms of attenuation and flavor profile. I welcome suggestions on that aspect as well.
     
  20. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,976
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    Ive made that beer before and yes it will taste just like your wanting , good luck
     

Share This Page

arrow_white