Humpty Dumpty English Bitter is likely a dumpty

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Sebrina, Jun 5, 2021.

  1. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    You are tasting yeast in an active stage - it won't taste very pleasant.

    You should wait 8-10 days before taking your first sample. Even after 8 days, if there is still a lot of yeast in suspension it will most likely not taste as expected (yeast strain dependent to some degree). If your fermenter is clear then simply wait until the beer starts to clear and the yeast drops out of suspension before taking your next sample.

    "However, no way will this beer be at its best when done. Just too hot for too long." - as others have stated: as long as you didn't pitch the yeast while it was still hot or leave it open to potential wild yeasts then you are fine. I've waited hours before pitching - no big deal. Many will wait overnight to allow a gradual cool down - again, fine.

    Give it time :) - Often easier said than done. -
     
  2. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Here is a link to an excellent article on this forum for the beginning brewer. Learning to brew will take time. There is so much to learn, but it will come from time, experience, and of course patience.

    https://www.brewersfriend.com/brewing-for-beginners/
     
  3. Sebrina

    Sebrina Member

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    I am going to keg it. But now the trub valve is clogged. I cannot clean while the beer is fermenting.
     
  4. Sebrina

    Sebrina Member

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    Thank you for your kind words. I did not dump it but now the trub valve is clogged. It is a grainfather conical fermenter. Any suggestions as to how to unplug it?
     
  5. Sebrina

    Sebrina Member

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    Thanks. Trying to empty the sediment but the valve at bottom is not working. I cannot get anything to come out. Grainfather conical fermenter. So much stuff in there. I have to get this out. Any suggestions?
     
  6. Sebrina

    Sebrina Member

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    Thank you. I am going to make another beer today. Everything is set and ready to go. HOpefully I will make less mistakes. The English Bitter I am making had to be dumped into the conical and now I can't empty the sediment at the bottom. I have a transfer pump which I can do when I keg. Hopefully this will keep me from getting all the sediment but I would like to fix it so I can get as much of the trub out as possible.
     
  7. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    I use to ferment in containers without drain valves, used an auto siphon to rack from fermenter to keg.
    Screenshot_20210607-105126_Chrome.jpg
     
  8. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Old tech: siphon the beer out.
     
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  9. Sebrina

    Sebrina Member

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  10. Sebrina

    Sebrina Member

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    Got the trub out from bottom of fermenter. 2nd fermenter is set up and ready for me to start cooking. Going to read things one more time. The most important thing is NOT to make the same mistakes. The chiller now has a proper hose it is hooked up to so I can cool wort in all in one brewing system and glycol chiller will help it get down to 70 degrees once it is transferred. I think this time could be easier and better.
    The beer is truly pale. Because I didnt use the screen during sparge I am guessing I did not do well to get it all. We shall see. I need to look up color again. It is in one of my books how it should look.
     
  11. Sebrina

    Sebrina Member

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    Yes, I had that when I made beer in buckets. I got the valve unplugged. It is quite awesome actually. I have a pressure transfer kit as I am going to keg it. It is interesting to think about still using something like that.
     
  12. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    I tip my fermenters back so the trub settles away from the spigot, not sure if that is feasible with the grainfather fermenter. It is hard to tell from the picture, but it does the trick!
    20200417_221523.jpg
     
  13. Sebrina

    Sebrina Member

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    I got one of these delivered to me. They had to come back and get it. I am getting the trub out fine now. THis fermenter has valves at bottom that do this. It was so thick I had to keep opening and closing as it clumped out. Eventually beer was coming out. I should have done it sooner. I know better. The gravity has gone down but still nowhere near its final gravity. I have fermenting now at 50 degrees. 4 days at 70 degrees. But there was not alot of movement with yeast yesterday. I went down to fifty this am. Slowly starting to move again.
     
  14. Donoroto

    Donoroto Well-Known Member

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    Leaving the trub in until the very end has some benefits for the beer. Much of the trub is yeast, almost as much is hops, both needed. I am kinda new to this, but I would not remove the bottom sediment prior to completed fermentation.
     
  15. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    This is a good piece of advice!
     
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  16. Minbari

    Minbari Well-Known Member

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    I do this. Once active ferm is done. At the time that people would transfer to secondary, i dump trub out the bottom butterfly
     
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  17. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    Why drop the temp? If you've already done 4 days at 70 then I'd just let it finish at that temp. What type of beer is it? I start my beers at lower temps and either let them free rise on their own to a certain point or allow most the fermentation to happen and then drive it up with heat pads to allow it to finish up.
    The movement you are seeing now is happening because of the yeast/trub dump you just did - the movement stirred the yeast back up into suspension more than likely.
    Are you dropping the temp to get down into a cold crash state? If so, I'd wait until the fermentation in complete to do so.
     
  18. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Dropping the temp before final gravity is reached is a perfect formula for a stuck fermentation. Few yeasts ferment at their best at 50 degrees, even at the beginning of fermentation, and certainly not a yeast that would be typically used for an English Bitter.
    Where did you get the notion that lowering the temp would be beneficial? Temperature fluctuations are very much undesirable. At this point you've stressed the yeast in every possible way and I wouldn't count on a full or clean fermentation.
    English Bitter with the right yeast is one of the easiest beers to brew. Next time you attempt it, keep it simple...Mash at 152 or so, get a good boil, cool to 68 degrees, pitch Nottingham yeast or S-04, hold the temp at 68 (no higher) for around 7 days, drop temp (optional), let the yeast settle and bottle up.
     
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  19. Donoroto

    Donoroto Well-Known Member

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    Good advice.
     
  20. Sebrina

    Sebrina Member

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    Finally kegged my Humpty Dumpty English Ale. Took six hours to move from fermenter because the couplers were all backwards and then I had to hook up others, etc. That said, beer is actually very interesting. I want to make it again because I know I did not get all the complex flavors. But need help. I have the gas at 12 psi. But the beer is coming out flat. What am I doing wrong?
     

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