How to use glucoamylase?

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by BenBe, Oct 30, 2018.

  1. BenBe

    BenBe Member

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    May someone help me how to add glucoamylase to my fermentation bucket for my new New England Pale Ale.
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Why are you adding it? Isn't it an enzyme that hydrolyzes dextrines?
     
  3. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I don't honestly know what that is for.
     
  4. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    So if it's a maltase glucoamalyse it'll break down maltose chains. That will make simpler sugars that your yeast can ferment and will make the beer feel drier, or less sweet.

    Adding during the mash will allow you to denature the enzyme when you bring the wort to the boil, which stops you over attenuating (getting a really dry beer) but may also mean you don't get the beer as dry as you want. Adding after the boil will mean the beer will definitely get dry, but as you can't easily stop the enzyme, you won't be able to stop it and it may get too dry.

    Personally I wouldn't be adding it to a NEIPA. It's more commonly associated with Brut IPAs and I think people generally add them to the mash. Though I've heard of people adding them after the boil and you're now another case.

    Anyway that's all the background stuff that you possibly already know. As to how, I can't think of any way other than just pouring it in. If it's contaminated I can't think of a process that would kill the contamination without denaturing the enzyme. No idea about the amount though. Sure to be something on the internets on that.
     
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  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Exactly, Mark. That's why I asked the OP. I'm pretty certain, this being a beginner's forum and all, that someone made a recipe with the enzyme added and our OP is blindly adding it without knowing why. I'm imagining the resultant beer as being pretty much pure hop juice, no body, harshly bitter, kind of like the brut IPAs I've tried. So my recommendation as to how to add it: Close the bottle, put it on the shelf, and think about why you would use an ingredient in a beer after discovering exactly what it is the ingredient does.
     
  6. BenBe

    BenBe Member

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    thanks
    easy to use
    just pitch over the ferment
     

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