How to prevent chill haze

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by jcj99be, Feb 10, 2019.

Tags:
  1. jcj99be

    jcj99be New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2018
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    I finished my first brew. Everything looked fine until I put a few bottles in the fridge. When I pulled one out to drink it was cloudy (it was clear when I put it in the fridge).

    After a little internet research, I found that this is a common problem called Chill Haze.

    I was interested in the community advice about chill haze how you deal with it:
    1) What is the cause of chill haze? I read that it can be caused because the wort boil isn't strong enough and proteins don't clump together enough during the hot break? Is it just me or does this happen to everyone?
    2) What can I do about it the next time? I read about adding Irish Moss after the boil? How does it work? Do any of you systematically add something to soak up these unwanted proteins?
    3) I also read about using whirlfloc? But I can't find any here in Belgium... I found something called "biersol" has anyone used it?
    4) To salvage this batch, I read that if I just leave the bottles in the fridge for a couple of weeks, the proteins to settle to the bottom and the beer should clarify?

    Really interested in your advice for my next batch!
     
  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,480
    Likes Received:
    2,699
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    You'll have to provide a lot more information about your "first brew"...pretty impossible to guess at a solution with no idea of how you arrived at the problem. ;)
    Sometimes even beers that are done pretty much by the book will haze if they're cold enough. I had some bottled lagers in a chamber that was near freezing and noticed a momentary haze at pouring one. At temps in the low 30s, they've been nothing but crystal clear.
     
    Trialben likes this.
  3. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2018
    Messages:
    4,701
    Likes Received:
    6,906
    Trophy Points:
    113
    How does the beer taste?
    If it tastes good, don't worry about it too much. Don't get hung up on clarity, taste is what really matters.
    I normally add whirlfloc with 15 to go in the boil, and have also used Irish moss at the same time in the past. Sometimes I have forgotten to add either, and have not been disappointed with those batches. I don't know how either of these fining agents work
     
    Trialben likes this.
  4. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,469
    Likes Received:
    9,555
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    I've recently changed to electric brewing and my boil these days is probably half as strong and I have noticed a bit of haze hanging around in my beers early on.

    As JA pointed at some more info will help. Your grist may have wheat or oats which will help contribute to some sustained haze. Also type of yeast used . I also hear a good count of calcium in your water helps with reducing haze I don't know the science sorry just what I've read.
    If I want a clearer beer sooner than if I left it lager in which case it "should drop clear eventually" I'll use geletin after cold crash on transfer to the keg I find this quickens up the clearing process.

    I think this is why the big boys have "Bright Tanks" somewhere for the beer to clear before packaging:rolleyes:.
     
  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,480
    Likes Received:
    2,699
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I suspect that our OP is jumping to conclusions...
    Most likely the haziness is just yeast leftover from bottle carbing and stirred up during the pour. Chill haze is a relatively advanced and even somewhat sporadic problem encountered when brewing all-grain. We don't even know if the "first brew" was all grain or extract. It's all speculation and potentially added confusion until we get a better picture.
    There's probably more obvious issues (or non-issues, as the case may be) and nothing more than a little patience is required to rectify the situation. :)
     
    Trialben likes this.
  6. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2013
    Messages:
    2,494
    Likes Received:
    1,584
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Happily retired
    Location:
    Upper Michigan/Florida
    BOB357, Trialben and J A like this.
  7. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,480
    Likes Received:
    2,699
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I'm still hoping that @jcj99be will chime back in and give us some details...I've been curious about this one. ;)
     
  8. ChicoBrewer

    ChicoBrewer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2018
    Messages:
    908
    Likes Received:
    912
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Healthcare IT Manager
    Location:
    Chico, CA
    I think I'll name my next beer "chill haze". Sounds like a rock band or maybe a new ingredient for a rave.
     
    Mark Farrall, Trialben and J A like this.

Share This Page

arrow_white