How to bottle nitro beer w/o widget?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Jhogan0101, Oct 13, 2019.

  1. Jhogan0101

    Jhogan0101 Member

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    Apparently left hand is able to do this. Anyone figure this out yet?
     
  2. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    I really don't think the widget is a big factor.other than adding nucleation points. The bottled Guinness I've had without it wasn't noticeably different.
     
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  3. Jhogan0101

    Jhogan0101 Member

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    So you bottle with 75n2 and 25co2 and it works for you?
     
  4. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    I'm referring to Guinness' bottled stouts. Just an observation.
     
  5. Jhogan0101

    Jhogan0101 Member

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    Yeah i get that my original question was how do they do it?
     
  6. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    #6 HighVoltageMan!, Oct 14, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2019
    The widget in Guinness is a big factor in the beer. When the can is opened, the pressure drops in the can releasing the nitrogen, or so goes the theory.

    As far as left hand being able to do it without a widget, they have not revealed how they do it, it's a tightly kept trade secret. I know nitrogen will not stay in solution without being under pressure, my guess is that they developed a way to package the beer completely under pressure. So when you open the beer, the nitrogen comes quickly out of solution giving you a frothy pour. Others suggest they add a drop of liquid nitrogen to the beer at packaging, allowing the nitrogen to remain in the beer long enough to package it.

    Not likely an easy thing to do for home brewers, you can still do it by kegging and serving with beer gas. No bottling that stuff at home.
     
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  7. Jhogan0101

    Jhogan0101 Member

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    thanks for the info, i purchased a liquid nitro dewar and will get it filled at my local gas place for $40. Hope the bottle doesnt burst when i put drop into it, ill be wearing full armor just in case.
     
  8. AGbrewer

    AGbrewer Member

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    Be sure to post an update about what happened. I like to make stouts and only bottle. I was always wanting to be able to do nitro in bottles, but just never figured a way around it.
     
  9. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    No way to do it when bottle conditioning.
     
  10. Jhogan0101

    Jhogan0101 Member

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    Why?
     
  11. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    Bottle conditioning means using yeast and fermentables to give the beer it's bubbles. That means CO2.

    If you're going to get the N2 into the bottle you'll probably need to do that via some sort of bottling keg. You could try something like a bottling gun connected to Nitrogen and skip the keg step, but I'm guessing that's probably a much more wasteful version of the bottling keg approach.

    So once you've got your beer and nitrogen into the bottle last thing you want to do is to add fermentables for bottle conditioning, as that will just dilute the Nitrogen with CO2.
     

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