"Hoppy Lager" experiences?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by J A, Apr 23, 2021.

  1. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,628
    Likes Received:
    2,884
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I need to brew my wife's favorite beer - a basic pale ale with Simcoe, Centennial, Mosaic, etc - and I have a huge pitch of very fresh lager yeast. There's a local beer that's a hopped lager (probably mosaic/citra) that she likes, also and there are some other local beers running form session IPA to hazy pale that are just as suitable. Bottom line...as long as I get good hop flavor without over-the-top bitterness in a clean, crisp beer, she'll be happy. :)
    I usually use US-05 and count on esters that compliment those hop flavors and aromas as well as a slightly softer, fuller mouthfeel. If I use my lager yeast (Apex Munich Lager...it's a clean-machine fermenting monster) I can count on slightly crisper finish (not a problem), probably more malt flavor (not a deal breaker) and a little less support of the hoppy flavors and aromas.
    I'm thinking that I can ease off the calcium chloride in my usual lager water profile and maybe bump up the gypsum, mash a little higher than usual to ease the attenuation and leave more dextrines for a little smoother mouthfeel and add some extra Mosaic or Citra in the whirlpool to boost the hop aroma and flavor.

    Thoughts?
     
    Vesparados and Sunfire96 like this.
  2. philjohnwilliams

    philjohnwilliams Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2012
    Messages:
    354
    Likes Received:
    470
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Verdun, quebec
    Sounds to me like you have fully thought this through, I say brew it and report back when it is done.
     
    J A and Sunfire96 like this.
  3. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2017
    Messages:
    1,440
    Likes Received:
    1,626
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Not sure if it's the Weihenstephaner strain, but does that throw some useful esters if you ferment a little warmer? It certainly comes across as pretty clean when I've tried beers where it's been brewed at ale temps.
     
    J A likes this.
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,548
    Likes Received:
    6,881
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    Excellent test case: I'd imagine "hoppy" loves the fruity esters from an ale yeast. Interested to see how your brew turns out... Mashing higher sounds like an excellent idea - the dextrines provide perceived sweetness, should play well against the hops.
     
    J A likes this.
  5. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,712
    Likes Received:
    10,503
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Totally agree the hops will need more body than a standard lager maybe some carahell/Munich too.
    Yup if it's anything like 34/70 it'll be a great match.

    Honestly though I usually stick to ale yeasts when going hoppy and havnt tried one with 34/70 so I'm all eyes and ears to see if you brew a wife pleaser:)!
     
    J A likes this.
  6. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,628
    Likes Received:
    2,884
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I'm just finishing up a big fermentation with the Apex and it's hard to know whether it's more like the S-23 or the 34/70 strain. Simple logic says that it's one of the established dry strains bought in bulk and not a proprietary culture and since they call it "Munich" the Weihenstphaner seems likely.
    In my experience, the S-23 strain will go more Kolsch-ey, especially at higher temps and that would be useful here. What I'm getting so far from the current fermentation, having fermented at 58F, is more like the 34/70 - quite clean with rich maltiness. Even the 34/70 strain may get a little fruity at higher temps, like you say, so I'll just have to play it by ear and see what I get. :)
    The local hoppy lager predated Brut IPAs and hard seltzers as a light, crisp alternative to the typical Pale Ale or Hazy beers. It's a nice style, especially in the heat of a Texas summer, but I personally find it a little neither-here-nor-there in character and would usually rather have a more malt-centric, nobel-hopped Pilsner.
     
    Mark Farrall likes this.
  7. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,628
    Likes Received:
    2,884
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I'll be using 2- row rather than Pilsner malt for this and will include a fair percentage of Vienna. That ought to go a long way toward some body and flavor. The thing that would probably bring it home would be just a small percentage of Honey Malt. I'd have to make a trip to the LHBS for that but I'm pretty sure I've got a decent amount of a 15L Munich that might make a reasonable substitute. :)
     
    Vesparados and Trialben like this.

Share This Page

arrow_white