Help with an ancient hop receipe

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Korpi Brewery, Sep 4, 2019.

  1. Korpi Brewery

    Korpi Brewery Member

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    Hi all!
    I would like to ask your common opinion on how to best utilize a bag of locally grown hops.
    Here's a little background for hop growing in Finland: Back in the 17th,18th and 19th century it was required by law for every land owner to grow a certain amount of hops for the crown. This law is in fact still valid, though not in effect.

    Today semi-wild and wild hops grow across the country and these varietes have been studied in recent years. I managed to acquire a bagful of these hops with a detailed analysis of its chemical fingerprint. Now the question is, what kind of beer should I brew with these delicate cones?

    Here's the chemical composition:
    alpha acids: 2%
    consisting of:
    Cohumulone: 0.6%
    n-Humulone: 1.1%
    Adhumulone: 0.3%

    beta acids: 2.8%
    consisting of:
    Colupulone: 1.5%
    Lupulone+AdL: 1.3%

    The chemical composition was described as "unusual", consisting of "extra" compounds.

    I understand these hops are very low in acids and very delicate overall. I've got 180grams (6 ounces) of dried cones and I can make 23 liter (6gal) batch. What should I do with these? Aroma/flavor only or single hop it? What style to shoot for?

    Appreciating your input!
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I'd start with something very simple to get the "feel" of the hops, how they taste, how they smell, how they bitter (it makes a difference). If you're sure of the 2% AA, try something very middle of the road with a boil, flavor and aroma addition, then "dry hop" some of the batch. A little test never hurts and it produces beer!
     
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  3. Korpi Brewery

    Korpi Brewery Member

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    Would a 9%abv Imperial Pilsner be simple enough?
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    It isn't what I'd do but by all means, if you think it's a valid test, go with it. I eas thinking more along the lines of a 5% ABV SMASH blonde.
     
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  5. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    I'd use them all in a pretty simple beer, split somewhat evenly between 60, 30 and 0 minute additions. Use the recipe calculator to keep it under 20 ibus and the rest goes in at 0.
     
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  6. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    I'd go with above light ABV light grist clean ale or lager yeast and hoped as above.
     
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  7. Korpi Brewery

    Korpi Brewery Member

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    Thank you for your input. I have a strong pils on my plans, and that's why I brought it up. Based on your feedback I may tone it down to a regular pils just to see what these hops are made of. Pilsner and light Munich malts 9:1 ratio. OG in the 1.050 region, shooting for 18-22 IBU range.
     
  8. Mie

    Mie New Member

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    I'm going to be trying out some more similar experiments with locally grown hops from Sweden (Which had similar laws to Finland).
    I don't have a chemical analysis of them sadly.

    So far I made one beer with them. It was a very simple ale, with pale ale malt and some wheat a tiny tiny bit of cara red. I assumed the alpha acids were in the 3 to 5 ish range for mine as I knew of some similar hops from my region.
    It turned out to have quite sweet apple like notes with a hint of pepper.
    (The ale turned out way too strong though due to my own error but new attempts to come)

    I'd love to hear how your beer turned out, brewing with these ancient odd hops is pretty exciting!
     
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  9. Mie

    Mie New Member

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    So I brewed a small 10L batch today with a super simple grain bill and some local hops my mom picked for me! (The ale & pilsner malt was just what I had left over to make it work, but I'd have gone for either.)
    I will let you know how it turned out :)
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    DSC_8605.jpg
     
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  10. Mie

    Mie New Member

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    Sorry for hijacking your thread @Korpi how's your tests going?

    I just tried my test today, very early on for sure as the beer is about as cloudy as the autumn day I held it up against.

    But the hops I brewed with have an interesting green-apple-grape like aroma toward the white wine direction.

    I feel like the very thin body beer I made gave the hops a way to really punch thru even if they are actually quite faint. So I'd recommend that for testing hops :)

    I'd bet alpha acids to be around 2.5 rather than the 4.5 I punched into the recipe calculator but that's pure speculation.


    20191021_154633_2.jpg
     
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