Half as much for twice the time?

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Bierman707, Sep 2, 2018.

  1. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    Rookie question: if I cut the hops quantity by half and doubled the time it was steeped, would I end up with the same result with flavor? Or close to it?
    I don' like really Hoppy beers, but my new favorite is brewed under the purity law. So it only has the 3 ingredients. Just wanting a little insight on how hops makes a difference.
     
  2. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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    There are 4 ingredients , if they told you it's 3 then they lied to you
    Water
    Barley
    Hops
    Yeast
     
  3. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    I stand corrected. I didn' really count the water. I figured that was a given.
     
  4. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    This is my favorite. It says ale but it doesn' taste like an ale.
     

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  5. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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    Sorry if I came across sarcastic or dismissive .
    Yes it is an ale but it's really a wheat beer, a pretty good one at that
    So what about the hops do you want to know?
    Boiling less for twice the time won't fit this style, hops are not the star of the show and the flavour comes from the yeast
     
  6. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    Well, I don't want to overdo it on the hops. Every single recipe I've read has so many ingredients...
    I just want a pinch of hops, so I was just wondering if steeping 1oz of hops for 15 minutes would be the same as steeping a half ounce for 30 minutes.
    The comment about the yeast is really good information and I thank you for that. I had read how much of a difference yeast can make but I think I haven' given it' due and proper yet.
    I'e already got the yeast I want ordered... let me look up the yeast real quick.
     
  7. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    Sorry, I made another roomie mistake my commenting on my own thread instead of replying to yoour comment.
    The yeast I've ordered just says Munich Classic. It is, from what I can tell, the type of yeast i would want for the kind of beer I want.
     
  8. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    The longer the hops are in the boil, the more bitterness they impart. If all you want out of them is bitterness you can boil less of them for a longer time. But if you want hop flavor or aroma, those disappear if boiled too long.
     
  9. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    No. Get used to using the Recipe Calculator and plug your ingredients/hop additions in and see what the result is. There's no need to guess.
    Sometimes when people say they don't like hoppy beer they mean they don't like bitter beer. A Czech pils has a very firm bitterness without a lot of hop flavor. Current trend in pale ales and hazy IPAs is huge hop flavor without as much lingering bitterness as a traditional IPA. I suspect you mean bitterness based on your other statements. As noted, longer boil means more bitterness and if it's a high-alpha acid hop the bitterness can be much, much higher by reducing the amount and boiling longer.
     
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  10. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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    OP seems interested in cloning a classic hefe, he won't get much choice in ingredients .
    Hops are only here to provide low bitterness and balance out the grainy sweetness of the malt with most of the flavours coming from the yeast.

    Are you planning to brew extract, partial or full mash ?
    As for the impact of different varieties and the flavour/ aroma you can extract from them with different methods , that my friend is a subject that several books could be written about .
     
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  11. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    No, because hop isomerization isn't linear. Use the bitterness calculator or the recipe builder to predict your outcome.

    By the way, if you only use the three ingredients, you'll probably not get beer. Yeast was not in the Reinheitsgebot but it's rather hard to make beer without it....
     
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  12. sbaclimber

    sbaclimber Well-Known Member

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    Just throwing in my 2ยข here... Munich Classic looks good for what you want to do.
    Don't let the term "ale" throw you off. It is often used to describe a beer that is top-fermenting, as is the case with a wheat beer. Needless to say, using that definition, there a thousand different types of "ale" out there. ;)
     
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  13. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    The yeast was added to it in 1906. I wouldn' brew a batch without it.
     
  14. sbaclimber

    sbaclimber Well-Known Member

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    ....and wheat wasn't in the Bavarian version from 1516 either.
     
  15. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    There were exceptions made... The Reinheitsgebot was much more about pricing and taxation than beer quality and the original lasted, if memory serves, about eight years before exceptions were granted. The parts of present day Germany that weren't under Bavarian control could do what they pleased anyway. I like to brew "Reinheitsgebot-inspired" beers rather than sticking to the letter of the law.
     
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  16. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    I can respect that. I just want a very simple, true to tradition beer for my first brew. I'm very excited about it and am doing a lot of research before I commit to brew day.
     
  17. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Don't just make things up. Search the recipe section and you'll find a couple of dozen Franziskaner clone recipes. If you actually intend to make something close in flavor to that beer, you'll need pretty specific ingredients and those will give you a starting place in understanding what goes into that beer. All you really need is Pilsner, wheat, noble hops and a Hefeweizen yeast but there are varying combinations.
    It's not even clear whether you intend to brew an extract beer or are contemplating all-grain. A little information about your equipment and intended process would net you a lot more guidance in terms of how to go about it.
    The good thing is that you've chosen a very noob-friendly style. You'll get something that will remind you of that beer and it'll be a nice, easy drinking style that you'll enjoy. It's easy to make a pretty good Hefeweizen, though it takes a lot of care and experience to make a really great one.
     
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  18. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    @Bierman707 hey man. Are you an all grain or extract brewer? That's a really tasty beer and pretty limited on ingredients like you're looking for. Couple different grains like pilsner and wheat, along with a decent yeast, and some hops like tettnanger, hallertau or saaz, and you'll be on the right path.
    As for the hops. If you use the recipe editor and enter the type of beer you're planning, it will give you a range that fits the style. Try to stick in that area and you will be headed in the right direction.
     
  19. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    I'm using 3lbs of dry extract in a kettle, whole cone centennial leaf hops, and Munich Classic yeast. So far, I'm still learning a lot. There is so much more to brewing your own beer... I just want something I made and to like it.
     
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  20. Bierman707

    Bierman707 Member

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    I'm so new that really, I'm just trying my best to get a drinkable brew.
    I'm using 3lbs of dry extract (german white wheat) whole cone centennial hops (steeped) and Munich Classic yeast. I will be asking loys if questions...
     
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