gyle for kegging

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by cacildo, Feb 24, 2015.

  1. cacildo

    cacildo New Member

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    hi everyone,
    have anyone ever kegged using gyle? I've used gyle for bottling all the time but I am wandering, for kegging, shoud I use the same amount of wort or like with sugar should I use less for kegging then we use for bottling?

    Thanks
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    you use C02 for carbing in a keg, you have to have it anyway to dispense the beer
     
  3. cacildo

    cacildo New Member

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    Actually is to be used with a beer engine, so no CO2 will be used.
     
  4. Hammer One Brewhouse

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    Nice! I want a beer engine..... Treat your keg like it was just a big bottle of beer, if you have had success using gyle in bottles and were happy with the results. Why Not?
     
  5. cacildo

    cacildo New Member

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    Very happy in fact, the beer stays fresh for a longer period and the flavor input is great.

    My question is, if we use table sugar for example the amount for bottling and kegging is not the same, so will it work the same way with unfermented wort?...
     
  6. Hammer One Brewhouse

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    For 5gal
    For Original gravity reading of:

    Use this amount of gyle
    1.030 needs 2 quarts
    1.040 needs 1 1/2 quarts
    1.050 needs 1 1/4 quarts
    1.060 needs 1 quart
    1.070 needs 3 1/2 cups
    1.080 needs 3 cups
    1.090 needs 2 2/3 cups
    1.100 needs 2 1/2 cups
     
  7. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    Hammer,
    Where was this referenced from?
     
  8. Hammer One Brewhouse

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  9. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    Interesting, I'm trying to understand using a lesser amount in an higher OG beer. I'd think regardless of gravity, less gyle would give a lower carbonation.
    I'll need to look into this further.
    Brian
     
  10. cassa

    cassa New Member

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    I was thinking the same thing, because they talk about the OG of the beer, which seems irrelevant after fermentation is complete. But I think what really matters here is the specific gravity of the gyle (b/c it's from the same batch, it's the same as the OG of the beer). Higher spec. gravity of the gyle means more sugars for the yeast to use for carbonation.

    Disclaimer: I've never tried this approach to priming.
     
  11. cacildo

    cacildo New Member

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    With this method things are not so simple.

    You have to consider the amount of wort at the end of boiling, the OG, the FG and the amount of CO2 you want in your beer.

    Imagine that you save 8% of your wort at 1.050, and you have a target FG of 1.010, this will give you a carbonation that will be different if the target FG is 1.012. My advice is to freeze the saved wort. This will ensure that it is as fresh as when you finished the boil.
     
  12. Hammer One Brewhouse

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    True, it's not simple using gyle to carb and get consistent results. Corn sugar is much easier. I prefer force carbonation over anything. It's been a long time since I've bottled.

    Making beer is only as complicated as you make it.
     

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