grain water absorption

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Zambezi Special, Jan 3, 2022.

  1. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    Just curious what the water absorption is, esp for the BIAB brewers ;)
    I think I may be pushing out too much wort, causing some cloudiness in the beers.
    I don't have my figures here, but I think it's about 300-400 gr water absorption per kg grain
     
  2. Sunfire96

    Sunfire96 Well-Known Member

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    I have mine set to 0.35 qts/lb. I don't squeeze, that's all gravity. I used to squeeze, but I never noticed an impact on clarity. All that stuff should fall to the bottom eventually
     
  3. Minbari

    Minbari Well-Known Member

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    My thought exactly.

    I do squeeze, even more than that, i built a "cider press" to get every drop. Between gelatin and cold crash. Can get crystal clear
     
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  4. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

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    .11 gal/lb. (So that's what, .44qts/lb).
    I squeeze some, but only enough to hit my pre-boil volume. And I agree with @Sunfire96, I don't believe squeezing the bag has anything to do with finished beer clarity. That's a whole different subject.
     
  5. Herm_brews

    Herm_brews Well-Known Member

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    I have mine set to 0.25 quart/pound, and I drain and gently squeeze the grain bag.
     
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  6. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    Thanks
    I thought maybe it has an impact.
    Maybe I should just keep my beers a bit longer, but that's going to be difficult!
    I don't mind then hazy at all, as long as the taste is good
     
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  7. Donoroto

    Donoroto Well-Known Member

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    A little late to the party, but I use 1/2 quart per pound.
     
  8. Pricelessbrewing

    Pricelessbrewing BF Software Manager
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    #8 Pricelessbrewing, Jan 4, 2022
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2022
    Sorry not going to convert all this to metric, and this is all based on non BF data.

    Generally mashtun brewers get 0.125 gal/lb. If you lift the bag and allow to fully drain, or do moderate squeezing, you'll get around 0.08 gal/lb. If you squeeze/press very aggressively you'll maybe go down to 0.07 gal/lb. If you just let it drain mostly via lifting until it slows down, then drop it, or do very light squeezing it'll be around 0.09 gal/lb.

    Those are very standard and common numbers gathered from thousands of brewers across multiple brewing community sites. I'm curious what it would look like from BF data, I'll add that to my free time to do list.
     
  9. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    And wort clarity and finished beer clarity isn't a simple relationship. There's a bunch of other things in play, like yeast health and pitch rate, wort composition, what happens during the boil, what you transfer to the fermenter, etc. that are probably more important to finished beer clarity than the wort clarity after the mash.
     
  10. Minbari

    Minbari Well-Known Member

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    Maybe its the weevils! :oops::D
     
  11. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I use a conventional system - false bottom in a MLT - and use the default 0.5 qt/lb.
     
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  12. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    Who knows :rolleyes:
    There has been some wheat malt in every brew sofar :)
     
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  13. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    Yep, use the weevil wheat and focus on hazy's! Haha.
    For me , on a bigger system, I use .1 gal/ pound of grain and get very repeatable results
     
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  14. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    I worked mine out and I am quite low at around 300 gram per kg grain
     
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  15. Dirty Dingo Brewing CO.

    Dirty Dingo Brewing CO. Active Member

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    there isn't really any magical number to calculate grain absorbtion. There are too many factors, there is what grain you're using (i.e. rolled oats, wheat etc vs regular grain) and it can change based on what supplier you have. We have some suppliers who have very small grain and some that are much larger

    I wouldn't worry about it. I'm with @Mark Farrall. If you want clarity you need to be more worried about using fining agents (IRISH MOSS AND WHIRLFLOC) what your mash temp is, and if you are REALLY worried about it, do an extra long boil.

    You can also rack into a secondary fermenter, but that is too much risk to oxidise for myself
     
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  16. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I read up a bit more on haze.
    I'm sure there would be a big improvement with a more vigorous boil.
    But my current set up isn't powerfull enough.
    I don't mind the haze as long as the taste is good :D
     
  17. Frankenbrewer

    Frankenbrewer Well-Known Member

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    As @Trialben said in another thread, "clarity only counts with judges." I would not worry about it if you like the taste.
     
  18. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Appearance counts for 3 points of a possible 50. Haze may cost you two. If the beer tastes good, haze is not much of an issue, even in competition.
     

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