Golden hops

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by mechamaniaboy, Oct 18, 2018.

  1. mechamaniaboy

    mechamaniaboy New Member

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    Hi, I’ve been given a load of Golden hops from this years crop by a friend. He knows nothing about them at all other than that the plants are very old. Has anyone got any idea as to the approximate AA content of this variety or a method to determine it?
    I spent a while removing cones from the stems and my fingers quickly became coated in sticky yellow lupulin that was difficult to wash off, Lovely!
    Any help greatly appreciated.
     
  2. N0mad

    N0mad Well-Known Member

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    Were they grown in Colorado or California? New Belgium also makes a beer called "The Hemperor HPA"
     
  3. mechamaniaboy

    mechamaniaboy New Member

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    Hi N0mad, neither! They were grown in Oxfordshire, UK this year. I keep forgetting this site is American
     
  4. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I'd say start with a low average AA value for calculation and use your taste buds to tell you. If you could get a small quantity of packaged and labeled hops of the same variety, you could do a small split boil batch. If you've done identical boils with the same wort and compare the finished beers, you'd know right away whether one was perceptibly more bitter.
     
  5. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    Are you sure its golden and not golding? Goldings usually have 4-6% AA and are a traditional English hop that is also grown elsewhere now.
     
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  6. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    Lucky dog! Make a very English IPA. You can add other English hops as well, but I would avoid American to keep it truly English. Sometimes hops from friends can get oxidized from poor handling, so they may not keep long.
     
  7. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    That makes much more sense. UK Golding would be a more likely.
     
  8. skyblue67

    skyblue67 New Member

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    Golden hops are a decorative variety not suitable for brewing, so hopefully you've got Goldings
     
  9. mechamaniaboy

    mechamaniaboy New Member

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    Is that right? I'm not doubting your advice, btw!
     
  10. mechamaniaboy

    mechamaniaboy New Member

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    Sorry no, skyblue66 and J A , the variety is most definitely golden hop. I appreciate the misunderstanding with goldings but these cones are really golden yellow in colour and my fingers were turned into a 60 a day smokers after just a few minutes from all the gorgeous golden lupulin. I've got just short of 210 grams of these babies so I'm gonna make a go of them with some familiar quantities and cross my fingers!
     
  11. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    There are 2 hops that are called "Golden". One is a decorative hop grown for shade and trellis-cover. The other is recently renamed from a hop first introduced in 2015 and called Idaho 7. I'd be very surprised if 007:The Golden Hop, as it's being called, is in wide enough distribution to already be cultivated in UK.
    And all hops, or at least most, will produce tons of yellow lupulin if they like the growing conditions. So at some point they're pretty much all "golden". :)
    Whatever you have, it sounds like it'll make beer.
     
  12. mechamaniaboy

    mechamaniaboy New Member

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    Hi J A, thanks for your explanation. I’m feeling a bit more confident now to do a trial brew. Thanks again.
     
  13. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    The worst thing that can happen, you make beer. Go for it!
     

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