Gluten free beer

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Brewer #188080, Nov 2, 2018.

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Gluten free

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  1. RIBrewer

    RIBrewer New Member

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    I would ask if someone had the experience to share it with me about the production of gluten-free beer. I have a few questions.
    First - Which raw material is the closest to the taste of barley
    Second - the production process itself, whether it is the same as with barley
    Thirdly - if I use syrups (esw. agava nectar, corn syrup, sorghum syrup...), should I use enzymes for starch decomposition
    Fourth - I read that some producers of enzymes have enzyms products that break gluten and with these enzyms is possible to use standard barley - does anyone have any experience with it?

    Any help is useful

    Thank You in advance
     
  2. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    I brewed one a ways back. It was all extract from lhbs and some sort of syrup from a good grocery store. I'd have to dig, but I recall sorghum extract and rice syrup.
    It turned out meh, but that was when I first started brewing. Can't help you much more than that
     
  3. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Oh, it was the exact same process as making beer with barley extract
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Answers:
    First - None. They're different materials, so they taste different. Sorghum syrup is generally the most "beer like" and is used for beer in Africa quite a bit.
    Second - It's the same as an extract batch.
    Third - No. By giving up the proteins, you already should plan for a thin beer. And the grains, whatever the base, has already been mashed. Remember, agave nectar, corn syrup, honey, etc. are already simple sugars, no decomposition needed.
    Fourth - Yes. Those enzymes exist; however, they do not create a "gluten-free" product, they only reduce the amount of gluten.

    I've done a gluten-free beer, turned out drinkable, if not great. May I ask why you want to make one of these?
     
  5. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    there's also something that's supposed to drop the gluten out of a regular beer to where it's basically gluten free. Clarferm i believe? I've used it only once in a brown ale and i couldn't really tell the difference in taste. It might have been slightly thin, but i didn't brew it without the additive, so I can't say for sure.
    She still didn't drink the beer, so not even sure if worked to be honest.
     
  6. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    Clarityferm is the additive to drop the gluten. I've had beers from a local place that uses it, they tasted fine. It is supposed to drop the gluten to levels that won't hurt gluten intolerant people, but if I was gluten intolerant I would still be careful, as I can't guarantee that the gluten doesn't get remixed into the beer if the fermenter gets shaken. Maybe that's not something that happens, I don't know the science of it, but you don't want to get hurt.
     
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  7. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    yeah. if you're really sensitive to gluten, maybe just skip that beer altogether
     
  8. JS

    JS New Member

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    I have an excellent recipe for Gluten free beer. My friend loves IPAs but developed severe Celiacs in his 40s.

    Here's the base recipe for 5 gal:

    6 lb White Sorghum Syrup - Gluten Free
    24 oz Honey
    1 lb Rice Syrup Solids
    4 oz Maltodextrin

    White Sorghum Syrup: https://www.northernbrewer.com/products/maillard-malts-sorghum-extract-syrup?variant=8008579350572

    I buy six at a time. Amazon sells it as well as Midwest Supplies.

    For yeast I used Safale US-05. I also threw in 1 oz of grapefruit peel with 10 min left in the boil. Here is the list of hops that I used for the IPA (Christmas gift for my friend):

    0.5 oz Chinook Pellet - Boil 60 min
    0.5 oz Simcoe Pellet - Boil 60 min
    0.5 oz Cascade Pellet - Boil 20 min
    0.5 oz Chinook Pellet - Boil 20 min
    0.5 oz Cascade Pellet - Boil 5 min
    0.5 oz Chinook Pellet - Boil 5 min
    1 oz Amarillo - Whirlpool 20 min
    0.5 oz Chinook Pellet - Whirlpool 20 min
    1 oz Cascade Pellet - Dry Hop 5 days
    1 oz Citra Pellet - Dry Hop 5 days

    He was astonished at the taste. The ABV hits the high 6s.

    I brew gluten free occasionally as I do have other friends with gluten issues. I've made all mosaic IPA as well as a peach version with light hops. The peach beer was as exceptional as the others, a great summer beer.

    I still have some bottles of the peach gluten free from this summer, I may have to open a bottle this evening...
     
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  9. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I make beers for a buddy who's brother has gluten problems, 1 clarity ferm didn't do the trick but 2 clarity ferm packs has made every batch so far drinkable for him. I don't do anything special, I just do a 10 gallon batch and drop 2 clarity ferms in one of the carboys with yeast pitch.

    I have found Clarity Ferm does make the krausen go kind of bat shit though, I've had huge messes with it and the other carboy not even needing a blow off tube.
     
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  10. KC

    KC Active Member

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    There is a difference between gluten intolerance and celiac disease. "Gluten free" certification allows for trace levels of gluten that can still send an extreme celiac to the hospital. I don't believe any of the de-glutenizing solutions are 100% effective. Other gluten amounts can come from cross-contamination of sorghum, corn, oats, and rice at facilities that also process wheat and barley, or even from yeast. The nutrient included in smack packs and vials is often barley or wheat based.
     
  11. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Spot on. Celiac disease is an immune reaction and can be triggered by minute quantities of gluten. Enzymes reduce the gluten to near zero but not zero. Gluten intolerant people will likely not notice the small amount of gluten left by enzymes like Clarity Ferm any more than I notice the small amount of lactose in cheese - I'm lactose intolerant, meaning if I get too much lactose in my system at any one time, my gut bacteria have a feast on the sugar I can't digest, leading to some rather predictable consequences. So, sorry, no milk stouts for me!
     
  12. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Yeah that is why I didn't say Celiac, I'm not confident if he is or not. I understand he has a bad reaction to gluten but I also know people who are "gluten sensitive" once they find out what they ingested but not before.
     
  13. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Strange, I've made the same observation concerning the "gluten sensitive."
     
  14. RIBrewer

    RIBrewer New Member

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    Hello guys

    Thanks to everyone for advice and help.

    As far as the celiac , it's not my problem. I have some problems with the intestines and the recommended therapy is to avoid gluten. For me, the gluten concentration below 20 ppm is excellent. For some time I've been cooking classical beers, I would not want to stop with that practice, I would only cook a gluten-free beer, of course, if it tastes well enough. I've never done a gluten free beer and I want to make it good and with a minimum amount of gluten.

    I found - http://www.thehealthygrain.com/kebari-barley/ - it is company from Australia. They developed barley with contains of gluten below of 20 ppm.

    If i good understtod :
    1. use enzymes and clasic barley to get good beer under 20 ppm of gluten
    2. use syrups, sugars etc, which does'not contains gluten
    3. use barley without gluten
     
  15. KC

    KC Active Member

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    Potato beers are not unusual for GF brews. I've made some. Not quite the same but not nearly as different as I'd expect.
     
  16. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    If you just need low gluten try clarity ferm, it doesn't require you to change anything, just add the vials to the carboy when you pitch yeast.
     
  17. Wireman

    Wireman New Member

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    Hello- I am a new member and see this thread ended over a year ago. Not many GF folks in the group? I only have GF brewing experience and have nothing else to compare to. Tired of poor quality store-bought products I did not enjoy much, so learned to make my own. Made from a GF kit first with sorghum and cascade hops, basically; a blonde ale; and a red Irish ale this year. All or mostly sorghum based. Don't have the equipment to lager. Anyway, hope to hear from some other GF folks in this effort.
     
  18. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    My buddies brother I believe is celiac and was able to handle beer with a double dose of Clarity Ferm but other than that I've never put much time or research into it.
     
  19. Wireman

    Wireman New Member

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    Hello- I am a new member and see this thread ended over a year ago. Not many GF folks in the group? I only have GF brewing experience and have nothing else to compare to. Tired of poor quality store-bought products I did not enjoy much, so learned to make my own. Made from a GF kit first with sorghum and cascade hops, basically; a blonde ale; and a red Irish ale this year. All or mostly sorghum based. Don't have the equipment to lager. Anyway, hope to hear from some other GF folks in this effort.
    Appreciate the comment, and so quickly! While I do not have celiac, inflammation is a problem with my health and I do best without gluten, and I like beer. I have seen the Clarity Ferm product too sold locally and hear good things in general. For now don't need it. I do use Whirlfoc (sp?) for clarifying with good effect. Perhaps when I use those up may try the other. Thanks!
     
  20. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    No worries, I have no issues either way so I count on him letting me know. They found 1 packet of it didn't clear it enough for him but 2 did. Not really sure what that means for ppm/ppb wise.
     

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