Foamy Keg, flat Beer

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Brewer #110860, Oct 27, 2017.

  1. Brew'Bass'n'Q

    Brew'Bass'n'Q New Member

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    Need some help. I have looked around many places for answers and still can't seem to figure out what my issue is. I made a red ipa and force carbonated it in a 5 gallon keg. 3 days later I checked it and still seemed pretty flat in carb levels. Came out pretty foamy. I put the keg back up to 30 PSI and 3 days later checked it again. Seems like the carbonation was a little better but still tasted like a beer that had been in a half drunk growler the next day. Problem is that it is coming out with mostly all foam. I finally got a thermometer in the kegerator and saw the temp was at 44 so I lowered it. and got it down to 38*. I keep reading about getting it to equilibrium levels but not sure how to know if its there or not. Not sure what to do at this point to avoid wasting anymore by tapping it and foaming out. My hose length is 5 ft and I tried dispensing between 8-10 PSI. I can't figure out how to get more carbonation into my beer and prevent the foaming at dispensing.

    Please help!!! (I'm thirsty)
     
  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    If it's all coming out as foam, the CO2 dissipates as the bubbles break and the liquid collects in the bottom.
    Be sure it's cold. It would be better to carb at temp below 38F, IMO, but if the pressure is up, it should work.
    Before you try to serve, purge all the pressure off the keg, set the reg at zero and increase it just enough to get beer out - 1-2 lbs. It will pour slowly, but it should be holding any CO2 that's in suspension and you can tell what the actual carb level is. Once the hose clears it should start running pretty clean and you can up the pressure to get exactly the head you want.
    If it's not carbed to the proper level, you won't have much luck.

    Use the temp/pressure table here:
    http://www.drinktanks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/CARBONATION_CHART_DRINKTANKS.png
    Pressure the keg up to the proper level for the volumes you want at the temp you're holding. Disconnect from the tank and leave it overnight. Reconnect the hose in the morning and see what the pressure reads. If it's the same, your beer is carbed to the proper level. If it's lower, the beer is still absorbing CO2 and you need to leave the CO2 connected until it carbs up. If it's zero, re-pressure and find the leak(s). If you have leaks, get some keg lube.
     
  3. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    have you checked out some online calculators for hose length? (hehehehe)
     
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  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    there are many people in the same boat as you and all kinds of reasons other than hose length, I have a similar foaming issue but its directly related to my tap system because its mounted in the wall outside the keezer, the taps are at room temp and the beer is at 34F, that creates foam every time I pour the first glass, as the taps get colder the foam dissipates as for the force carbing if all you get is foamy beer try carbing slowly at serving pressure, it will take a week longer but it seems to be a better mixture for me
     
  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    My hoses are substantially shorter than any calculator recommends. I have no problem with foaming due to hoses. When I've had problems, it's been overcarbed beer or overpressured kegs. I carb to the proper level, hold at recommended pressure for the temp/CO2 volumes and reduce pressure for serving.
     
  6. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Sound to me like your in an awful hurry to guzzle some of this beer. I'd do as JA recommended in burst carb method but then let it sit for a week back down at serving pressure. I also find my first pour from the tap is always not the best 2nd and so on get better as the tap and font cool. My line length is 4 meters 5mm internal diameter hose so plenty of line length to allow for this equilibrium and hopefully reduce foaming.

    Let us know how you fair mate and I hope you get more beer in your cup soon:).
     

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