Floor Malted Pils vs Pils Malt

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Nola_Brew, Dec 18, 2019.

  1. Nola_Brew

    Nola_Brew Active Member

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    What's the difference? Is it just the malting process that separates these or is it taste?
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Technically, it's a malting process. Floor malted tends to be a bit less modified, meaning it has to be handled differently in the mash. It's slightly lighter in color, slightly different in flavor. I can't tell a flavor difference in my brewing - it's lost in other variables.
     
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  3. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

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    piggybacking, anyone notice a difference between Weyermann Pilsner and Weyermann Bohemian Pilsner? Is it just where the barley is grown?
     
  4. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    #4 HighVoltageMan!, Dec 18, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2019
    Floor malted pilsner does have a slightly richer flavor to me, but I really don’t care for it. It's also less consistent than standard malt because it’s done in a more “manual” way, so it changes from batch to batch.

    I’m over all the “new” malts, floor malted, straight variety malt like Barke. I went back to blended pilsner malt like Wyermann and like the beer better. I still have a weakness for straight up Maris Otter, it’s hard to beat it.

    It’s hard to beat modern malts.
     
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  5. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    Bohemian Pilsner is slightly richer to me, but not necessarily better. It doesn’t work for all beers, but it’s pretty good in a pils.
     
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  6. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

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    good to know, it's offered at a slightly better price point which is why i ask.
     
  7. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    #7 thunderwagn, Dec 18, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2019
    I've been a bit curious about some of the 'craft' malts out there. Sometimes I wonder if they aren't under, or maybe even over modified,
     
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  8. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    I think malting grain is a well developed process and requires a lot of experience. Most malting companies strife for the highest quality possible, so I wonder about these new malting companies too. I’m pretty happy with the grain I get, the biggest problem I have Is when I wreck a perfect good malt by making a crappy beer with it.
     
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  9. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Well, you know Root Shoot. I've had some questionable malt from another vendor - it was supposed to be undermodified for decoction mashing. Like everything else, the smaller the batch the greater the variation. If I were running a brewery where batch-to-batch consistency mattered, I'd be a lot more careful where I get my ingredients but since I'm a hobby homebrewer, the bit of variation is not a problem as long as the malt performs to expectations.
     

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