Fermentation - no airlock for post primary conditioning

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Brewer #96154, May 12, 2020.

  1. Brewer #96154

    Brewer #96154 New Member

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    Hi

    I have read enough to support being comfortable using a loose lid for primary rather than an airlock. Assuming I ferment out and leave the beer in primary for 2 weeks is it ok to let the beer condition in a glass carboy for 1 week with its screw cap on and not use an airlock before then bottling? I simply don't have an airlock due to being in Botswana with a hard lock down and no deliveries coming from South Africa. Is there any risk of enough of a CO2 build up in a week to blow the bottle?

    Cheers
     
  2. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    Cant you rig up an airlock with some hosepipe or so?
    Or something like a blow- off thingy?
    On another note: we are still roaming free in Zambia. No total lockdown, just difffcult to get in and out of the country (and the pubs are still closed)
     
  3. Brewer #96154

    Brewer #96154 New Member

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    That's a good idea if I need to do it. I am more after understanding the risk if I don't. The simpler I can keep my brewing the happier I am. To my mind, a week of conditioning in secondary of a beer that has fermented out should be low risk but I am not certain. Glad you guys in Zambia are not so restricted. We can't exercise in our neighbourhood but people can go to church. Madness.
     
  4. sbaclimber

    sbaclimber Well-Known Member

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    Seeing as the carboy has a screw cap, you could just unscrew it a tiny bit once or twice a day, to release any pressure that has built up.
    As long as fermentation is mostly complete, you are unlikely to build up too much pressure within 24hrs...
     
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  5. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Welcome there .
    Do you have cling wrap or Alfoil. With cling wrap place it over the opening and prick it with a pin or so to let gas out. With alfoil just scrunch it over the opening. Or as above if you do have a lid just leave it on loose so the gas can escape.

    As long as the fermentor is relatively sealed and free from air born particles and anything that touches the beer is cleaned and sanitized I rekon you'll be fine.
     
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  6. Brewer #96154

    Brewer #96154 New Member

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    Thanks - was worried about the risk of oxidisation with this approach. Not a risk?
     
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  7. Brewer #96154

    Brewer #96154 New Member

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  8. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

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    I will second the idea of foil. While most of the CO2 has been released during primary, you don't want to take the risk of over-pressurizing a glass container. I do my secondary conditioning in a sealed keg, but the keg is rated for 130 psig and has a relief valve.

    Sanitize some foil and wrap it tight around the opening. There will be enough of a pathway for any CO2 produced to escape.
     
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  9. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion, this is the best approach.
     
  10. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    It'll work, too. Bacteria can't crawl.
     
  11. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Not necessarily because of the co2 produced during fermentation will fill the headspace of the fermentation vessel. The tricky part with oxidation is packaging. Moving the beer once it's finished in the fermentor.
    I've done fermentations in a cube or drum with the screw lid just on lightly with no problems.
    I just watch for signs of fermentation ending then I screw the lid on tight and let the fading fermentation build up pressure in the cube. When I cold crash this helps reduce the suck back.
    Anyhow you've got some options now.

    Where in Africa are you from again?
    You been brewing long and if so what style extract/ all grain Biab?
    Cheers
     
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