Everything Bagel Seasoning

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by TrailTrash, May 29, 2018.

?

Adding Everything Bagel Seasoning to boil or secondary?

Poll closed Jun 5, 2018.
  1. add with 5 mins left in boil

    62.5%
  2. add to secondary

    37.5%
  1. TrailTrash

    TrailTrash New Member

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    I am going to be brewing an Everything Bagel ESB. Saw a thing on it, and wanted to try it. I am curious whether I should add the seeds in the last 5 minutes of the boil or add them to secondary.
     
  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Just curious...Did you actually try a beer with sesame, poppy, onion, garlic, salt and enjoy it? Enough to brew an entire batch? ;)
     
  3. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I'd agree with JA: Best place for everything bagel seasonings and seeds is on a bagel. But if I were going to do it (and I can't imagine why), I'd do five minutes prior to flameout, hoping it would boil off some of the dried onion flavor....

    All snark aside, it's your beer. If you want the flavors, the dried stuff has to rehydrate and the spices need some time to work so five minutes prior to the end of the boil sounds right to me.
     
  4. TrailTrash

    TrailTrash New Member

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    There was an episode of Beerland on Viceland where someone made it, and they said it was pretty good. Figured Id give it a go and see what happens. Even thought of leaving the salt, garlic, and onion out and just using the poppy & sesame
     
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  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    You may be on to something with limiting the spicing to poppy and sesame. I was imagining an onion gose - not my idea of a great beer!
     
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  6. KC

    KC Active Member

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    The jarred seasoning gets baked on a bagel. You may want to toast that first, then coarse grind and add at 5m. I wouldn't expect secondary to pick up the seed flavors, and seeds will have yeast and bacteria on them.

    A true ESB is bready to start with so this idea may not be too bad
     
  7. TrailTrash

    TrailTrash New Member

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    Great idea to toast them first, thanks!
     
  8. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    If the stuff to toast is large enough, I think a hot air popcorn popper might be a good way to get a toasted flavor.
     
  9. KC

    KC Active Member

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    For small seeds, preheat an ungreased frying pan to about 400° and toss for 1-2 minutes or until you start to smell them. It doesn't take long.

    O/T: if you have extra toasted sesame, grind it up and add olive oil to make tahini
     
  10. okoncentrerad

    okoncentrerad Active Member

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    Extra O/T +1 on this, tahini is great to use in oriental dishes but also as seasoning in others. I usually add some lemon juice to it too.
     
  11. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Variety is the spice of life, I guess. Best of luck with it. :)
     
  12. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Likewise! Not something I'd try but hey, it's your beer!
     
  13. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    I will be interested to see how you work the big fat slab of cream cheese in there, me thinks in secondary...

    Sorry, couldn't help it...

    Good luck with it!
     
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  14. KC

    KC Active Member

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    Bagels and Lox
     
  15. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Allow a bit of diacetyl and tartness in there and voile! Cream cheese!
     
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  16. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    We are being a little harsh on our OP...it's a valid question, but I can't resist being a little perverse about novelty beers. :D
    Surely someone has some actual advice that's pertinent and helpful. :)
    And, @TrailTrash , I see that you are new so we should take an opportunity to welcome you. You'll find lots of very useful information here...and a little good-natured ribbing from time to time. ;)
     
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  17. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I hope you take the light ribbing in the spirit it's offered, TrailTrash. JA excepted, we're really a pretty friendly bunch.... We've seen lots of novelty ideas come and go. Best advice I can give is go for it and prove us wrong. I think most of my ideas have been covered by myself and others so good luck with it.
     
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  18. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    I hope that my post was taken as light ribbing, I apologize if I was "offside".
    Sincerely,
    Craigerr
     
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  19. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    Have you considered making tea with the spices and then tasting it?
    This will give you a good idea of the flavor contribution and also the amount you may want to add.
    I think the biggest problem is the amount of salt added. As Nosy said, unless it's Gose style, that's not good in beer.
    The Garlic and Onion are flavors that can be found in some Hops, so other than being stronger in flavor, I'd be fine with them.
    The other spices, as suggested, may be better toasted. I'd crush and press them between paper towels to get as much of the oil out of them as possible.
    Have fun with it and keep us posted.
    Cheers,
    Brian
     
  20. TrailTrash

    TrailTrash New Member

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    A little light ribbing is always fine by me. Believe me I make a lot of traditional beers as well. Just wanted to try this one for the novelty of it. Thought it sounded interesting and wanted to see how I could make it work. My thoughts are this, I’m going to just use poppy and sesame seeds, toasted and crushed and add at 5mins. I don’t want an overbearing flavor to hit you in the face with dried garlic and onion. I just want the seeds to come through. Chose an ESB for its yeasty/bread characteristics and added some biscuit malt as well. I’m actually doing a Kölsch this weekend. I’m doing the ESB next month with a buddy.
     
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