Ever brew with sweet corn?

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Wien's BBQ and Brews, Jun 4, 2013.

  1. Wien's BBQ and Brews

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    I have access to great fresh sweet corn ( I grow and sell it). I've been trying to come up with a recipe that uses sweet corn , either fresh or dried or dried then malted. I have had very little success finding much info. The only info I found said it probably should be boiled first, and cut off the cob and added to the mash. I found one place that said count it as half the ppg of flaked corn, so about 15. I will add my recipe in a little bit when I'm at a computer
    Any help would be great pp
     
  2. Wien's BBQ and Brews

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    Here's the rough draft of a recipe.

    I'm not sure it really fits the saison style, but that's where i stuck it for now. it might just be a specialty beer, when it's said and done.

    Another hop schedule i considered was just a 60 min bravo adition and maybe something else at 30, to keep the hop flavor very light, but i still want just a little hop flavor.
    Feel free to give any input (good or bad) info on brewing with corn has been hard to find online. I sent a brewery in Iowa an email (they brew a sweet corn beer) but i haven't heard back yet

    Ambrosiastic

    Brew Method: All Grain
    Style Name: Saison
    Boil Time: 60 min
    Batch Size: 5.5 gallons (fermentor volume)
    Boil Size: 7 gallons
    Efficiency: 70% (brew house)

    STATS:
    Original Gravity: 1.050
    Final Gravity: 1.010
    ABV (standard): 5.29%
    IBU (rager): 28.43
    SRM (morey): 6.69

    FERMENTABLES:
    8 lb - Canadian - Pale 2-Row (55.2%)
    0.5 lb - American - Caramel / Crystal 10L (3.4%)
    6 lb - Sweet corn (and cobs) (41.4%)

    HOPS:
    0.25 oz - Bravo for 60 min, Type: Pellet, Use: Boil (AA 15.1, IBU: 15.84)
    0.5 oz - Palisade for 30 min, Type: Pellet, Use: Boil (AA 7.5, IBU: 8.74)
    0.25 oz - Delta for 20 min, Type: Pellet, Use: Boil (AA 6, IBU: 2.14)
    0.25 oz - Palisade for 10 min, Type: Pellet, Use: Boil (AA 7.5, IBU: 1.71)

    YEAST:
    Danstar - Belle Saison Yeast
    Starter: No
    Form: Dry
    Attenuation (avg): 80%
    Flocculation: Low
    Optimum Temp: 63 - 75 F

    NOTES:
    Corn will be boiled, and cut off the cob, and blended. cobs and blended corn will be added to mash. mash at 154 for 60 min.
    I'm guessing on the PPG for sweet corn. I found a site that said it's about half of flaked corn.
     
  3. EvanAltman36

    EvanAltman36 New Member

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    I'm an extract brewer, but I'm interested in finding out how this goes for you. I grew up on a farm and we raised sweet corn, so I'd really like to brew a beer with that as an ingredient.
     
  4. Wien's BBQ and Brews

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    I will probably be brewing this in late July or Aug, I'll try to remember to share my results after I try it out.
     
  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    Ive brewed with (flaked corn) in the past and all I can say is the corn color and flavor really takes over, you might not like it with as much corn in your mix, also you will not have as much diostatic properties since its unmalted

    Diastatic discribes the malt and means it contains Diastase (or Amylase) and this is an enzyme that breaks starches into sugars.

    in my opinion its just going to add yellow color and corn flavor to your beer
     
  6. LarryBrewer

    LarryBrewer Active Member

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    With all that fresh corn, it also might taste like something from 200 years ago. A cool experiment, not saying this is a bad idea. Merely pointing out there is a reason 2-row has become the base malt of choice in most beers.
     
  7. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    moonshine or corn whiskey comes to mind too
     
  8. Wien's BBQ and Brews

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    Yeah I might cut back the amount of corn, but I'm guessing with it being fresh corn, it will take almost double to get the same taste (or close) as flaked corn.
    As little info as I found on it, I'm sure there is a reason it's not on everyones must brew list, but I figure I'll give it a shot and see what happens. worst case, i'll invite people over and make them drink the crappy beer up first, before they get a decent one!
     
  9. Wien's BBQ and Brews

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    I've been emailing back and forth with the head brewer at peace tree brewery in Iowa (they do a sweet corn seasonal). He gave me some advice on how they do theirs. It sounds like I was fairly close on most of it. I'm going to make a few adjustments, and hopefully brew this one this summer.
     
  10. cearum

    cearum Member

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  11. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Brewed a pre-prohibition-style lager with flaked corn as 25% of the grist. I like it. The flaked corn adds flavor, lightens body and yellows the beer. Sweet corn doesn't have as fully formed starches. You might try a small mash of half two-row and half sweet corn and see how many points/pound/gallon the sweet corn adds - the two-row should have enough diastatic power to convert the corn. A second test would be to do the same thing but cook the corn to gelatinize any of the starches that had formed. You should get 31 ppg from the two-row (37 theoretical times 85% yield). If you mashed a pound of corn and a pound of two-row and got a gallon of wort at, say 1.046 gravity you have 46 gravity points, 31 of which were from the two-row, leaving 15 ppg contributed by the corn.

    Flaked corn should yield 33 ppg. I'd guess sweet corn would be less.

    Cheers!
     
  12. LarryBrewer

    LarryBrewer Active Member

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    6-row might also be a good option because it has more enzymatic activity.
     
  13. mochaporter

    mochaporter New Member

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    So....any update on this? Considering doing something similar.
     
  14. Wien's BBQ and Brews

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    it turned out pretty well, i'm trying to decide if i'll make it again (with some modifications) this summer. I modified the recipe from the original one i posted.
    If I do it again, I will probably change to a less spicy hop, the yeast seemed to add quite a bit of spicy notes to the beer. My guess on PPG for sweet corn seemed pretty close. I over shot the amount of water I needed (because of the high water content of the sweet corn, and being only my 3rd all grain brew) I would leave the corn cobs out next time ( makes for a lot of work to stir the mash) and i might try different belgian yeast. I came out pretty good though I wish the corn came through a little more (yes, I know, that should be considered an off flavor in most beer)

    Here is what i went with.
    Ambrosiastic
    brewer logo Added By: Wien's BBQ and Brews
    Method: All Grain
    Style: Saison
    Boil Time: 60 min
    Batch Size: 5.5 gallons (fermentor volume)
    Boil Size: 7 gallons
    Boil Gravity: 1.042 (recipe based estimate)
    Efficiency: 60% (brew house)
    Source: Craig
    Original Gravity: 1.053 Final Gravity: 1.011 ABV (standard): 5.6% IBU (rager): 24.97 SRM (morey): 7.48
    Fermentables
    Amount Fermentable PPG °L Bill %
    9 lb Canadian - Pale 2-Row 36 1.75 50%
    0.5 lb American - Carapils (Dextrine Malt) 33 1.8 2.8%
    1 lb American - Caramel / Crystal 10L 35 10 5.6%
    0.25 lb American - Caramel / Crystal 40L 34 40 1.4%
    0.25 lb Rice Hulls 0 0 1.4%
    7 lb Sweet corn 15 3 38.9%
    18 lb Total
    Hops
    Amount Variety Type AA Use Time IBU
    0.5 oz Sterling Pellet 8.7 Boil 60 min 18.26
    0.25 oz Cluster Pellet 6.2 Boil 30 min 3.61
    0.25 oz Sterling Pellet 8.7 Boil 20 min 3.1
    Show Summary View
    Mash Guidelines
    Amount Description Type Temp Time
    -- Infusion 152 F 60 min
    Starting Mash Thickness: 1.25 qt/lb
    Other Ingredients
    Amount Name Type Use Time
    1 tsp irish moss Fining Boil 15 min
    Yeast
    Danstar - Belle Saison Yeast
    Attenuation (avg):
    80%
    Flocculation:
    Low
    Optimum Temp:
    63 - 75 °F
    Starter:
    No
    Yeast Pitch Rate and Starter Calculator
     
  15. PublicEnemy

    PublicEnemy New Member

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    I use corn in my cream ales. 80% barley, 20% flaked corn, US-05 or Nottingham. Adding sugar is within style too. Flaked dried corn is about the size of ground barley and is mashed at regular temp. Corn imparts a whiskey flavor to beer that's pretty cool. It might not grind in a regular grinder. It's pretty hard when it's dry. I'd suggest boiling the corn, scraping the corn, boiling the corn, and adding it to the mash. I wouldn't put cobs in. I miss that all white sweet corn we got when we were kids.


     
  16. Butter14

    Butter14 New Member

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    I would suggest doing a cereal mash technique for the mash and substituting some of that two row for six-row. Additionally, look into using a American lager yeast. That might work well with the corn ingredients. Good call on the addition of Rice hulls to the mash. Flaked corn and other adjuncts will result in a stuck mashtun (which is NO fun).
     
  17. Wien's BBQ and Brews

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    I have thought about trying to do a cereal mash with it, but I wonder if there is enough starch in fresh sweet corn to warrant one. I want to do some experiments and try to see if it makes a difference, but i'm not sure i'll make the time to do it this summer.
     
  18. PublicEnemy

    PublicEnemy New Member

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    Just made a corn lager using 10 lbs 2 row
    brewers malt and a dozen ears of beautiful
    sweet Ross Ohio bi-color corn. I boiled the
    corn first, then scraped it. I did a cereal
    mash with a hand full of the 2 row. Corn
    was right at 150 at this point so I rested
    the corn mash for 15 minutes then raised
    it to a boil. Then I added the corn and the
    cobs to the main barley mash which raised
    mash temp from like 145 to 150. Total
    mash time was about an hour. 45 minutes
    of which had the corn in there too.

    After chilling to 50 degrees I added about a quart
    starter of 830 lager which I like. OG is 64.

    I used 4 gal mash water, drained, then a
    quick sparge with 4 gallons 170 that settled
    at about 162 degrees. Got about 5 gal.

    2 days in the fermenter and
    it's incredibly sweet and powerfully corn
    flavored.

    I used 3 oz Hallertau at 60 min for about
    20 ibu. It's been raining so my city tap
    water has lower than it's regular alkalinity.
    I added 2 grams gypsum but your mileage
    will vary. Took a couple ml of phosphoric
    to get my ph down. More than 20 ibu and
    RO water would be better.
     

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