Dry hops idea?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by EPV Brewing, Jun 16, 2014.

  1. EPV Brewing

    EPV Brewing New Member

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    I have dry hopped before (method (1) below) and was looking for other dry hopping ideas when I came across this article.
    I have been thinking about trying the second method listed here and was wondering if anyone has tried this before. Might be interesting.

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    (1) Many commercial brewers will add their dry hops shortly after primary fermentation is complete, and leave the hops in their beer for a few days at fermentation temperature before cold crashing the beer. The advantage of this method is that you do get good hop oil transfer, and cold crashing the beer will allow any excess hop material to fall out of the beer.

    (2) Some brewers have experimented with adding dry hops during active fermentation (adding hops with gravity 0.004-0.006 above predicted terminal gravity.)
    One school of thought says this is inefficient as the CO2 bubbles during active fermentation will “scrub” the aroma from the hops and be lost.
    However, this is too simplistic a view, since hop aroma comes from the hop aroma oils suspended in the beer and is not merely some “gas” to be scrubbed out by CO2.
    The logic is that any oxygen introduced with dry-hopping will be consumed by the active yeast as it finishes the fermentation. There’s probably not too much aromatic loss at this point, since fermentation is fairly slow.

    What does happen during active fermentation is that you often get a slightly different flavor profile than dry hopping at a later time. The precise mechanism is not well understood, but it is clear that the chemical processes during active fermentation interacts with the hop profile and produces an entirely different overall effect. Commercial and home brewers have just started to play with this method, but it is an interesting option for those willing to experiment.

    More adventurous brewers might experiment with dry hops during active fermentation – which can produce some interesting results.

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    If you have tried both methods with the same beer what were the noted differences?
    Thoughts?
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    I have experienced both and will tell you that yeast do not like hops nor does it ferment very well while in co2. for best results the yeast need to paraphrasing "breathe and exhale the gas and not breath the gas"

    A great way to add hop flavor is to put hops in a bag and bring 1 or 2 cups of distilled or very filtered water to a boil and steep the hops , swirl it around and dunk for about 15 minutes creating a hop slurry tea, then cool and pour into the secondary or keg, gently mix without bubbles and enjoy instant hop flavor. now this will not bind very well with the molecules but will add fresh hop flavor to your glass of beer
     
  3. KingPaul

    KingPaul New Member

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    @OMB
    At what stage do you add the hop tea to your FV? And for how long does the flavor last if bottling? I had an issue where I dryhopped with 20g of cascade and after 3 months or so the flavor was not as pronounced as in the beginning.
     
  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    in a bottle or keg all hop flavor will diminish over time, thats why its best to drink hoppy beer right away

    as far as adding it when an to what, Ive done the keg and the secondary but it seems to mix better at 0 of the boil
     
  5. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    I typically follow the first method listed but over years of brewing have tried just about everything.
    When doing a no-chill method, I've added hops at flameout and then again during the fermentation on something hoppy but still wasn't happy with the results.
    Mostly dry hops go into the keg that I use as a secondary and then I'll transfer from keg to keg off the hops in about 5 days.
    Lately I've been experimenting with different times and temps for whirlpool hopping and am having some great results with that and not even needing any dry hops.
    Hope this helps,
    Brian
     
  6. Crookedeyeboy

    Crookedeyeboy New Member

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    Just to push the opinion the other way I have recently made a very good 7.5% IPA that was dry hopped during fermentation with 50g of Centennial and 50g of Citra. This really worked, the aroma and flavour stood out for weeks. I am now of the opinion it may well be the type of hop that keeps the flavour!
     
  7. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    ^^^^That's a lot of hops!
    Just Saying.
    Brian
     
  8. MrBIP

    MrBIP Active Member

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    So ....
    Then how about adding hops to the corn sugar/water boil for bottling? I've thought about this, but never really found anything definitive or pursued it. Could you jack up hop flavor / aroma with this one last add? Or would it just get all grassy and weedy?
     
  9. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    you could add the hop tea to the corn sugar mixture, stir it up really good without foam or bubbles and it should be fine, just remember that instant hops can taste different than boiled hops, some like it some dont
     
  10. Gazjam

    Gazjam New Member

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    I recently did an APA and was seriously happy with the hoppy character of the finished product. We did a hopstand/Whirlpool with Cascade at 60 degrees C (Myrcene essential oils carrying the flavour and aroma are boiled of much above this) for an hour and then dry hopped in cask for 3 days and served fresh. The aroma was just like opening a new bag of Citra, delicious!

    Hopping during fermentation isnt a good idea. The hops dont like it and the yeast doesnt like it (generally, some arent so bad), but there arent anywhere near the advantages as hopping before, and after.
     

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