Diastatic Power

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by jmac67%, Mar 5, 2020.

  1. jmac67%

    jmac67% New Member

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    Does anybody calculate the DP when making a recipe? What is the minimum DP to get good conversion? I do BIAB and am starting to look at brewing with more insight. I've always just thrown a recipe together, haven't made a bad beer yet. Knock on wood!
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Yeah sure do if I'm throwing alot of adjuncts in but I'm sure the calculator let's you know your Diastic Power and I think it's below 60 When it could be a conversion issue.

    I'm imagining also your mash if you've got a low DP will be a glutinous one so keep that in mind (rice hulls).

    Wheat malt I've found has a high DP so adding malts in your grist that are high DP is a goer.
    There is Amylase enzyme too you can add to the mash.
    And remember to extend you mash schedule
    To compenesate for the lower conversion time and even employ the iodine test to ensure full conversion has taken place.

    And one last thing watch your boil if heating via an electric element high adjunct mashes have burnt me twice;).
     
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  3. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    In most cases it's unnecessary, but there are exceptions. If you're using a more highly kilned base malt, like Munich, be aware that some are quite low in diastatic power and will barely self convert, let alone convert adjuncts. I'd also check if doing a short mash and/or a lot of adjuncts. Bare minimum is ~30 degrees Lintner per pound, but when you get below about 60 more time is needed for conversion. It's seldom that I use less than 80% highly modified base malt, so I never calculate it.
     
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  4. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

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    The recipe tool on this site does a quite nice job of calculating the DP. I use 2-row for my base and the DO is almost always above 90.
     
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  5. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    Another factor to consider with BIAB is that the typical process calls for the full volume of water to be used.
    When doing so, inevitably your PH will be higher and take the mash out of the desired range which can slow things down a bit.
    This being said, you may want to acidify your water or do the BIAB mash with the 1.25 qt./lbs. ratio and then plan a rinse or sparge to volume.
    Many ways to skin a cat.
    Cheers,
    Brian
     
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  6. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    Our software auto calculates for you:
    26CE6C6B-264A-452E-97D6-C72C5B574ABE.jpeg

    As you can see at the bottom of the fermentables, I have a DP of 115 (you can choose W/K if you wish instead of DP) and the minimum for conversion is 30 or above.
     
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