Day Tripper Recipe - 1st time using BF

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by uvmnick, Jun 29, 2018.

  1. uvmnick

    uvmnick New Member

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    Hello all!

    I am attempting to brew the Day Tripper recipe found on Indeed Brewing Co. website - https://www.indeedbrewing.com/recipes/day-tripper-5-gallon-all-grain-batch

    New to Brewer's Friend recipe builder and was hoping other members might be able to provide feedback on the recipe I created using the recipe tool.

    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/671387/day-tripper

    I've been playing around with this for a bit and I think I have it in a good spot. IBUs are more than the range, but I've read there's a lot of variables that go into that so I'm not too worried it being high. I think my concern was Estimated Boil Size and the Mash Temp and Volume (in Mash Guidelines).

    I think this is a great tool and am excited for any feedback to see if I'm on the right track.

    Thanks!
    Nick
     
  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Recipe seems fine. I'd lower the IBUs for an .052 beer. You could reduce the 20 minute Cascade amount and move the Summit addition to 5 minutes and get a little closer to 50. For Pales and some IPAs I find that if the gravity points and the IBU number are pretty close, it's a firmly hoppy beer without being too bitter.
    Yes, your boil volume seems high. I'd be surprised if you got more than about 1.5 gallons per hour of boil-off. I count on 2.25 gallons for a 90 minute boil. It's easy to top up a little if you get drastically under-volume/over-gravity but it's not as simple to fix things when you don't get the boil-off you need. And I'm not sure what the plan is for 6 gallons, but if your fermenter is big enough, carry on. I do 5.25 to 5.5 gallon batches for 6.5 gallon carboys and start with a boil volume of 7.75.
    Good luck! :)
     
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  3. uvmnick

    uvmnick New Member

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    Hey J A

    Thanks so much for reviewing and providing some feedback. I like your suggestions on the hops. I spent a lot of time making adjustmens trying to affect the IBUs. Certainly a learning curve to this, so knowing to tweak hops a bit is a huge.

    Yeah, not sure what I was thinking on the boil volume. I had 5.5 previously and something made me switch it. My fermenter is 6.5 gallons also, so will make that change.

    One more thing if you don't mind - does my mash temp and volume seem ok? Does adding a volume here even matter? When I remove it, it seems it doesn't do anything to the figures.
     
  4. BoomerBrian

    BoomerBrian Active Member

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    I generally mash my IPAs at 152. 155 should be ok. Any particular reason you are mashing for 90 minutes? 60 should be plenty
     
  5. uvmnick

    uvmnick New Member

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    Hey Brian -

    Yeah, I mashed at 152 for my last brew, a rye brown ale. I only pushed it up in order to make the the FG and ABV more in line with what I'm trying to achieve. Benefits of a lower mash?

    I chose 90 minute because I read elsewhere that a 90 minute mash allows for optimum extraction of starches from your grist than with a shorter (60) mash time. I'm a complete novice and still learning. Why do you prefer 60 minutes (besides saving 30 minutes)?
     
  6. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    In the calculator, it's more of a place-holder. It does definitely change the pre-boil gravity and can change the IBU contribution of early additions. Boiloff matters when you set up your equipment profile and use the "Brew" feature to compute water requirements. You need to have a good idea of what it is in order to hit your numbers.
    Boomer's notes on mash^^^are on point. If you're doing BIAB, full volume, you'll just need to have a handle on grain absorption. Volume seems way too much to me. I do regular mash-tun with fly sparge so those more familiar with BIAB specifics can help you more there.
     
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  7. BoomerBrian

    BoomerBrian Active Member

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    Modern malts are a lot better at conversion. Actually a lot of people are starting to mash at 30-40 minutes because conversion is usually done by then. 60 is just the standard "safe" time to ensure conversion has happened.

    Rather than mashing longer it would be more beneficial to make sure you ph level is in the correct range for good conversion.
     
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  8. BoomerBrian

    BoomerBrian Active Member

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    Also the lower the mash temp generally the drier the beer. Most people like drier IPAs so the hops will shine. The difference between 152 and 155 is probably minimal.
     
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  9. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    My step mashes are 30 mins each at 144 and 156 degrees, conversion efficiency in the mid '80s. Many modern malts are done in 20 minutes but I'm not ready to go that low (local brewpub has a standard of 45 minutes).
     
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  10. uvmnick

    uvmnick New Member

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    Makes sense. I'm open to trying a 60 minute mash. I'll do some research on ph levels. Is the range contingent on the type of beer you are brewing?
     
  11. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    PH generally works this way: The normal "range" is 5.2 - 5.6 with 5.4 the target. In general, lighter beers work best lower in the range, darker beers higher. But as long as you're in the range, you should be fine. I target 5.4 and accept variance due to inconsistent city water supplies.
     

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