Citra/Centennial IPA

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Brewer #117522, Feb 8, 2018.

  1. Brewer #117522

    Brewer #117522 New Member

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    Was thinking of doing this with some leftover ingredients I have lying around. Want it to somewhat towards the NE IPA style, but doesn't have to be perfect. Want a decent level of bitterness while still getting solid aroma/flavor. Haven't done to many in this style so help is appreciated... These are the only ingredients I have on hand/access to currently. I could pick up some more hops in a week or so which would be in perfect time for the dry hop schedule so if I need to add more into the boil in that is fine. I have the 2oz of Citra and 2.5oz of Centennial on hand. the 3 and 7 days are for how long after fermentation begins, not necessarily total dry hop time. S-04 is what I always use (occassionally US-05 and notty) I've never really used liquid yeast so would not be comfortable making that switch currently.

    STATS:
    Original Gravity: 1.061
    Final Gravity: 1.013
    ABV (standard): 6.28%
    IBU (tinseth): 44.88
    SRM (daniels): 10.22

    FERMENTABLES:
    5 lb - American - Pale 2-Row (67.8%)
    1.5 lb - Flaked Oats (20.3%)
    6 oz - American - Caramel / Crystal 40L (5.1%)
    0.5 lb - Cane Sugar - (late addition) (6.8%)

    HOPS:
    1 oz - Centennial, Type: Pellet, AA: 9.9, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 13.66
    1 oz - Citra, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 17.24
    1 oz - Citra, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Dry Hop for 7 days
    1 oz - Centennial, Type: Pellet, AA: 9.9, Use: Dry Hop for 7 days
    1 oz - Citra, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Dry Hop for 3 days
    0.5 oz - Centennial, Type: Pellet, AA: 9.9, Use: Dry Hop for 3 days
    0.5 oz - Centennial, Type: Pellet, AA: 9.9, Use: Whirlpool for 15 min at 175 °F, IBU: 6.18
    0.5 oz - Citra, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Whirlpool for 15 min at 175 °F, IBU: 7.8

    YEAST:
    Fermentis / Safale - English Ale Yeast S-04
    Starter: No
    Form: Dry
    Attenuation (avg): 75%
    Flocculation: High
    Optimum Temp: 54 - 77 F

    TARGET WATER PROFILE:
    Profile Name: Light colored and hoppy
    Ca2: 125
    Mg2: 0
    Na: 0
    Cl: 175
    SO4: 0
    HCO3: 0
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    looks good to me
     
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  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I'd leave out the cane sugar and settle for a little lower OG. Only problem with S-04 is that it'll drop out hard and may take your haze with it. It'll still be a good beer.
     
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  4. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

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    your water doesn't make sense.

    175 Chloride and 0 sulfate?
     
  5. Brewer #117522

    Brewer #117522 New Member

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    Oh, wow, ignore that. That's from a previous edit that carried over and I didn't save the change clearly.
     
  6. Brewer #117522

    Brewer #117522 New Member

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    Yeah, i thought that could happen, but im not too finicky about it being hazy hence the "it doesnt have to be perfect" kinda just looking for something that just leans towards that style.
     
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  7. BoomerBrian

    BoomerBrian Active Member

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    I would get rid of the cane sugar.
     
  8. Radcp

    Radcp Member

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    Very interesting, I love the body that the oats bring to a juicy IPA. Recently I made a pale ale with citra / centennial paired and it was just ok; but I strayed from my standard US-05 to a BRY-97 so this may have been the culprit and not the hops.
     
  9. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Rather than blanket advice to lose the sugar, why are you using it? I don't see a need for it but then it's not my beer.
     
  10. Brewer #117522

    Brewer #117522 New Member

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    I've seen quite a few recipes that use it so i just went that route. Not set on any one single total recipe currently, definitely open to changes which is why i made this post.
     
  11. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    A bit of good advice: If you don't know what something does to your beer, you should consider leaving it out. Sugar provides neutral alcohol (think diluted vodka), thinning the body of a beer as well as the flavor. This is useful in some beers, Belgian brewers use it to make their high-alcohol stealth bombers drinkable, but undesirable in most smaller beers. If that's the effect you're looking for, thinner body and less flavor, by all means use the sugar; otherwise, replace the sugar with malt.
     
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  12. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    I suppose it's working against what your trying to achieve with the oats I thought you added the sugar to lighten the body and mouthfeel to make it more sessionable.
     
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  13. Brewer #117522

    Brewer #117522 New Member

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    Ah, i see what your saying. I'll remove it for sure. Not my goal there at all. I just saw quite a few NE IPA recipes that used it (be it most of them were for milkshake ne ipas that also added lactose) so dunno if that factors in. When you say replace it with malt, would say a DME late addition work? As is my equipment for BIAB is gonna be close to the limits in grain it can hold so DME would definitely be much easier to accomplish. If so, what kind Pilsen? Light? Extra Light? Golden Light? Thanks for all the advice. It's definitely appreciated.
     
  14. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Any of those DME's will work fine. It really depends on the style of beer. If it's a big part of the recipe, stick close to the color of the beer you're brewing. If it's just to boost the OG, just pick something that you can buy a big bag of and keep it on hand and save a few bucks. I end up using bulk Light LME for anything I need to brew that's bigger than my tun will handle, even a big, dark stout.
     
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