Can’t figure out why beer is reaching fg so soon

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Brewer #230611, Jun 8, 2019.

  1. Brewer #230611

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    the beer I have in my fermenter now and the previous batch I made have the same issue where they both reached the FG number sooner than expected.
    I’m making an Irish red ale and the FG is supposed to be 1.010
    Today is day seven in fermenter. I took a reading and it’s at 1.008. Technically it’s supposed to be fermented for another 3 days but I think I should bottle it today or tomorrow so the fg doesn’t drop more.
    Also wondering why this happened.
    The similarity between the last two batches was the grains were milled too fine I think because sparging took a long time. And the beer is murky despite adding Irish moss.
    Any advice would be appreciated
     

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  2. Mase

    Mase Well-Known Member

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    Reaching FG in 7 days is really in line with most fermentations.

    Just out of curiosity, what’s the yeast, mash temp and OG?
     
  3. ChicoBrewer

    ChicoBrewer Well-Known Member

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    Couple of things.

    First - reaching FG in five days is about average for me. I'm not sure why you think that technically it should go another three. Yeast does what it's going to do. The best control you have is temperature.

    Second - Bottling won't stop the FG from dropping. There is nothing in the bottle that is going to stop fermentation. In fact if you add sugar to the wort for bottling and you have not reached FG in the fermenter you could possibly create bottle bombs.

    My Ales typically finish at 1.008 when I'm using US05. That is an 83% attenuation for my house Pale Ale. I adjusted the attenuation in my recipe to reflect what I get. I usually ferment starting at 64F then I ramp it up to 68 over four days to finish.

    Bottom line - I don't think you are experiencing anything unusual. You are making beer!
     
  4. Brewer #230611

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    That’s the yeast I used. Mash temp was 152F. OG was 1.043
     

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  5. Brewer #230611

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    The recipe suggests 7-10 days at 65F and then another 3 days at 68F
    Ok so sounds like I should just bottle it today and condition it for 14 days is what the recipe says.
     
  6. ChicoBrewer

    ChicoBrewer Well-Known Member

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    I would recommend leaving it in the fermenter for at least 10 days (mine stay for 14). Some kit instructions are designed for new brewers who are impatient. Patience is your friend.
     
  7. Mase

    Mase Well-Known Member

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    Seems like you attenuated around 82%, and Nottingham has a high attenuation rate, so I think you are good. Especially with a 152 mash temp.

    Even though the fermentation is complete, I’d still leave the beer go for 2 weeks total minimum for the flavors to develop a little and for the yeast to clean up the rest of the precursors to off flavors. They eat up the sugars before they eat their vegetables (so to speak). :rolleyes:
     
  8. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Here are the things that affect how soon your yeast finish:
    1. OG of the batch (how much sugar do the yeast have to eat)
    2. Pitch rate (how many of the hungry little yeast cells went in)
    3. Temperature (yeast function faster at warmer temps)
    4. Yeast strain (some strains are "hungrier" than others, some flocculate out sooner than others)

    I don't know about 1-3 but Nottingham is a pretty quick flocculator. Five days isn't out of line using it. As mentioned above, I'd give it 10 but given the variables, I think you likely just had a highly flocculant yeast strain that finished its job in five days.
     
  9. Brewer #230611

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    Ok so basically what I”m understanding is regardless of whether it sits in the fermenter or i bottle it (with the new sugars added for carbonation) if it’s the yeast that’s causing the issue, then it’s gonna continue to produce alcohol.
    What’s the benefit of leaving it in the fermenter? Sorry... i’m Pretty green.
     
  10. Brewer #230611

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    Yes for the first beer I made, i left it in for 14 days. It was a friends recipe i followed vs. This one which is from an online store.
     
  11. Brewer #230611

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    #11 Brewer #230611, Jun 8, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
    Oh boy. I just check the temp in my closet where I keep the beer and ... I think that’s what’s killing it. I’m at 23 C / 74F !!!
    The first batch I brewed was in the dead of winter and I idn’t Bother checking the temp.
    But the last two have been since the warmer weather.
    I think that must be the issue. Problem is that i rent. And i can’t perfectly control the room temps. This stinks.
     
  12. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    Yes, nottingham gets pretty weird flavors when fermented above about 68 degrees. For that yeast, I like it no more than about 63 degrees.

    However, that explains the quick ferment. I've personally seen beers ferment out overnight with warm temperatures like that.

    Next time, put the fermenter in a cooler or other bin, fill it will cool water around the beer and then add a frozen water bottle or two to the water. Check the water temperature by keeping a floating thermometer in there, and you could easily keep the beer at a more favorable temperature.

    Keep in mind that an active fermentation produces heat, so in a 74 degree room the beer could be as much as 10 degrees higher during that fermentation so it's important to try to control the temperature in summer temperatures especially!
     
  13. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    There are several advantages to waiting to bottle, but the best one is because if you bottle a clear beer you'll have less crud in your bottles in the end. With a yeast like nottingham, the beer is usually pretty clear by one or two days after fermentation ends, but waiting a bit longer is a good thing for the beer.
     
  14. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    With that yeast you're probably okay, beer may be a little fruity. Some of the Kviek yeasts aren't too finicky when it comes to temperature. You might give one of them a try.
     

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