Can I use a carbon filter on my beer?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by JohnAdam, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. JohnAdam

    JohnAdam New Member

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    #1 JohnAdam, Jan 9, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
    I have some 0.5 micron carbon filters I'd like to use to filter my beer to gain some additional clarity to my home brews.
    To help with refining resources let me provide a little background on my process.
    I have a 15 gallon brew system (brewing 5 to 15 gallon batches at a time). I use HERMS to step mash using pumps to transfer my brews.
    Fermentation takes place in either a 14 gallon or half barrel SS conical fermenter. My half barrel fermenter is connected to a glycol chiller permitting me to lager or cold crash in the fermenter.
    I cold crash my beer for about 7 to 10 days after fermentation is completed.
    After a trube dump I use co2 to push from the fermenter through a 1 micron filter into a keg where I force carbonate.
    I have a two stage filter and plan to put a 0.5 micron filter in line after the 1 micron filter for any brews needing to be very clear.
    Does anyone know if there is any issue or down side to pushing my beer through the 0.5 micron carbon filter?
    Apologies if this has been addressed in another strinG that I was unable to locate.
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    All I've herd John Adam is filtration may remove some flavour.
     
  3. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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    why not just use polyclar or similar in the FV? save using a pump/ gas to transfer to keg and my beer often comes out with brilliant clarity
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Second. Why go to the hassle of filtration when a bit of gelatin would do mostly the same thing?
     
  5. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    I haven't heard of anyone doing this but I do have some experience with carbon filtered water. The reason for the carbon filter is to remove mineral or sulfur or other off tastes or smells in the water. That being considered, a carbon filter would definitely affect the flavor of the beer. If you don't get clear beer with 1 micron filtering and proper brewing techniques IMO carbon filter won't make a better beer and will change the flavor of the beer.
     
  6. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    I've done a lot of testing with paper filters and my results are its fine but push the beer slow or the filters will bleed into the beer also its a one time process meaning sugar gets trapped inside the filter and the filters mildew even a couple of days after so throw them away and get new each time which can get expensive over time
     
  7. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    Third. I used to filter my beer with mixed results (carbon filters or "active" filters should never be used on beer, they will strip beer). I learned to clear the beer with finings and no filtering.

    The clarity of beer starts in the mash tun by getting the pH right. A pH of 5.2 with help drop out excess proteins. Second, use kettle finings (whirlfloc) in the boil. Third cold crash to help drop out yeast. Then treat with gelatin. 24 hours after the gelatin use PVPP (polyclar, Divergan F). Leave cold for 1-2 weeks and the beer looks like my beer in the picture of my post.

    Most beer when cold will have a chill haze. This is a weak hydrogen bond between the proteins and polyphenols naturally found in beer. A .5 micron filter will remove some of this, but most will stay in suspension. When you clear with gelatin, that removes yeast and proteins (along with some polyphenols). The PVPP with not remove any proteins, but will target the polyphenols by providing a stronger hydrogen bond than protein.

    I have written up my methods if anyone anyone is interested. I can provide a link to it on my google drive if you would like.
     
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  8. Timboson

    Timboson New Member

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    Maybe a long shot, since I'm reading this in 2020, but I'd love a link :)
     
  9. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    This looks like an OP Spammer / bot.
     
  10. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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