Burst Carbing - 2.5 gal

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Megary, May 22, 2020.

  1. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2019
    Messages:
    688
    Likes Received:
    1,743
    Trophy Points:
    93
    I've always used the "Set it and Forget it" method to carbing my kegs, but now I'm stuck trying to get a keg ready for Sunday that I just packaged last night.

    Important Note: This is a 2.5 gallon keg.
    Oatmeal Stout
    Targeting ≈ 10psi finished CO2.
    Fridge is at about 40-42 degrees.

    My plan:
    20psi for 2 days
    10-12psi for 1 day
    Leave at 10psi thereafter.

    The plan is already in motion as I kegged last night and I'm about 15 hours in at 20psi. But will this get me to where I want to be? As a frame of reference, my normal carbing method is 10-12psi for about 5-6 days and that seems to work just fine.

    All the info I read about Burst-Carbing seems to be based on 5 gallon kegs (or larger). I'm not sure how much difference the method would be for half that volume. I definitely don't want to overshoot on the CO2 as I hear that can be a bit of a pain to correct.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2017
    Messages:
    604
    Likes Received:
    884
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Controls & Instrumentation Engineer
    Location:
    Monroe, Louisiana
    Home Page:
    No difference. The pressure hits an equilibrium with the dissolved gas independent of the volume. Use the same pressure that works for 5 gallon.
     
    Megary likes this.
  3. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2015
    Messages:
    830
    Likes Received:
    807
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Big Lake MN
    I burst carbonate and I also spund carbonate. Some say spunding is better, but I can't tell the difference.

    I burst carbonate in 5 minutes (if the beer is cold). This can be done on a 2.5 gallon or 5 gallon, it doesn't matter. Keg head-space can play a role in the process, but it's very minimal.

    I set the regulator to 25 psi and shake it for 4-5 minutes. Let it set for an hour so it settles down and drink it. If it's a little low on carbonation after an hour, I leave it set over night at 15-18 psi. Works very well. I use this method for any beers I don't spund and I won't go back to waiting a week for a beer to carb up. The beers go into competitions and do very well, no complaints about the carbonation.
     
    Megary likes this.
  4. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2018
    Messages:
    4,701
    Likes Received:
    6,900
    Trophy Points:
    113
    My standard operating procedure is to set it to 35 PSI for 24-36 hours, then reduce to serving pressure.
    After the 36 hours it is usually still a little undercarbed, but another day at serving pressure usually gets it there.
    Hope this helps.
     
    Megary likes this.
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,381
    Likes Received:
    6,613
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    Generally my process as well, although I'm relatively new to the entire kegging thing...
     
  6. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2019
    Messages:
    688
    Likes Received:
    1,743
    Trophy Points:
    93
    There would have to be a difference in time to carbonate, no? In the extreme, can a 1 gallon batch and a 20 gallon batch carb in the same amount of time, all else being equal?? If so, then my head hurts.

    Reading this makes me think there is a difference with regards to Carbonation Time vs. Batch Volume:
    https://brulosophy.com/2016/05/12/sparkle-fizz-methods-for-carbonation/
     
  7. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2017
    Messages:
    604
    Likes Received:
    884
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Controls & Instrumentation Engineer
    Location:
    Monroe, Louisiana
    Home Page:
    Yes, there may be a time difference. If all else is equal, the 2.5 gallon batch will carbonate more quickly than a 5 gallon batch. The key is interface area between the gas and the beer.

    You can increase the area by using a carbonation stone or by just shaking the tar out of the keg. My favorite method for quick carbonation is pressurize to 20 psi, shake the heck out of the keg for a few minutes and repeat. A cold keg can be ready in 30 minutes with this method.
     
    Megary likes this.
  8. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2019
    Messages:
    688
    Likes Received:
    1,743
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Thanks for the replies. I'll hold off on the shaking method for now, though I can use that as a last resort.
    I will go take a small pull and see what 20psi for 24 hours has done. If very little, I'll ramp it up. If it's showing decent signs of carbonation, I'll just let it sit at 20 for another day and go from there.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white