Brown Ale question

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by KingPaul, Jun 28, 2014.

  1. KingPaul

    KingPaul New Member

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    Just brewed Palmer's Oak Butt Brown ale
    7lbs pale ale
    2lbs amber malt
    .5 lb caramunich III
    .25 lb chocolate malt

    14g nugget at 60
    14g fuggles at 15
    Calculated IBU = 29
    OG=1,054

    Tasted my wort now, and tastes quite bitter. I mashed at the recommended 152F
    I noticed beforehand that the amber malt has quite a bitter taste to it. The amber malt was milled about 3 months ago, all other malts where milled yesterday. Could the amber malt have gone bad? Will this bitterness mellow out during the course of fermentation? I was really looking forward to this brown ale.
     
  2. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    3 months isn't too long as long as they were kept dry. I'm betting the bitterness mellows with time though.
     
  3. TheZel66

    TheZel66 Member

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    Are you sure it's bitterness, and not astringency? What yeast did you use? Did your mash temp ever get too high?
     
  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    the chocolate can seem bitter, could just be the water, those brown ales need a softer water than most tap water for the city, Add potassium metabisulphite or use 50/50 distilled to city water or both
     
  5. KingPaul

    KingPaul New Member

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    I hope it's not astringency. But I never exceeded 68C during my mash. I used S-O4. I actually was contemplating using potassium in this brew, but I forgot about that this morning :oops: It's not that bitter, but a bit more bitter than I thought. And it's the same bitterness that I taste when comparing it to the amber malt.
     
  6. KingPaul

    KingPaul New Member

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    Just got this after some researching:
    Amber malt
    Amber malt is a more toasted form of pale malt, kilned at temperatures of 150–160 °C, and is used in brown porter; older formulations of brown porter use amber malt as a base malt (though this was diastatic and produced in different conditions from a modern amber malt). Amber malt has a bitter flavor which mellows on aging, and can be quite intensely flavored; in addition to its use in porter, it also appears in a diverse range of British beer recipes. ASBC 50-70/EBC 100–140; amber malt has no diastatic power.
     
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I almost always taste my wort and it almost always tastes bitter. Maltose and maltotriose aren't very sweet on the tongue so there's no balance to the bitterness at this stage. Bitter and astringent are different things: Bitterness is a taste, astringency is a feel. If your wort tastes bitter, you may have over-hopped but if it feels "puckery" it's astringency. You're likely all right. Let the beer ferment before making any determinations and let us remember the words of the Great Papazian: Relax, don't worry, have a homebrew.
     
  8. Arbe0

    Arbe0 Member

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    I have a nut brown ale I like to brew. It is pretty good but tastes better after aging a month or so.
     

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