Brewing Salts in Percentages?

Discussion in 'Feature Requests' started by Yooper, Feb 5, 2019.

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Should we add different % values for brewing salts?

Poll closed Feb 12, 2019.
  1. YES!

    1 vote(s)
    20.0%
  2. NO!

    4 vote(s)
    80.0%
  3. Either way is fine with me!

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    We have acids listed in the water calculator with an ability to change the percentage of the strength- for example, 88% lactic or phosphoric acid vs 10% and so on.

    Some requests have come in to do the same with the brewing salts, specifically those like calcium chloride. Would this be a good addition for you? Would you like to see this? Or would it be more confusing and in the way?

    Please vote and let us know if this is something you'd like to see, and feel free to comment here on why you chose the one you did.

    Thank you!
     
  2. ChicoBrewer

    ChicoBrewer Well-Known Member

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    Is this for solution additions?
     
  3. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Uh, why? Unless you're a solution, it's calcium chloride hydrate, the hydrate part is baked into the equations. Are you perhaps using the pre-made solution sold by cheese making companies?

    Acids come in solution, salts generally do not so I think this would cause more confusion than help.
     
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  4. ChicoBrewer

    ChicoBrewer Well-Known Member

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    It may be valuable. I'm thinking through it though. I'm thinking something like having a 4 liter container with salts in a proportion for a profile constructed in such a way as to enable adding say a liter to the strike water to make the profile. It should be easier to create a dilution with large amounts of salts than to weigh tenths of a gram accurately for a batch. I can see some convenience having pre-made standards on the shelf. . .

    I'll come back and vote once I have thought about it a little more.
     
  5. avantassel

    avantassel Moderator
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    One specific use case is this: "Not all salts are commercially available in 100% form here in Sweden. For example, CaCl2 is sold as 77% flakes or 30% solution."
     
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  6. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    No i recon leave it as is. I'm happy using the scale to measure out me salts. As Avantassel points out above not all salts are made equal then reflect the acid adition section where it gives you an amount depending on your %strength on the salt your using then add this weight to bring up your PPM.
     
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  7. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    You could be using cheesemaking solution, I suppose, and that's 30 % cacl.

    The beauty, however, of that is since cacl is so hydroscopic, creating a solution means no further degradation by water is possible so that could be a way to keep your calcl always at a certain %. Just a thought!
     
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  8. idserda

    idserda New Member

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    #8 idserda, Jul 28, 2020
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2020
    Just to clarify: if the water calculator says to add 1 ml of calcium chloride, and I have a 33% calcium chloride solution, I should actually add 3 ml, right?

    Having an input for the concentration sounds useful to me, would not require an manual calculation after that.
     
  9. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    #9 Blackmuse, Jul 28, 2020
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2020
    The suggestion confused me immediately. lol - I suppose if you can add with the ability for me to continue on as I normally do then I don't see the harm. If it creates a mess of a time sorting one way or the other than I'd rather not see it.

    EDIT: Sorry, Just realized this is a wicked old post and may no longer be relevant... Oops.
     
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  10. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    ml is for liquid items, but we don’t have a solution of calcl2 in there. But yes, that’s a good estimation if you’re using the anhydrous choice that says to add 1 gram. (NOT 1 ml!!!! That’s for liquids).
     

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