Brew options for newbie with 10gal kettles

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Brewer #128484, Feb 9, 2018.

  1. Brewer #128484

    Brewer #128484 New Member

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    5 gallon batches are the smallest I can make with these kettles. I’d like to make a couple smaller batches and keg into two 2.5gal kegs, so that I have more flexibility to experiment without a single 5 gallon brew. The only variation that I can think of is dry hoping differently when secondary in keg. I have several 5 gallon carboys from my wine making days. Any ideas on how do smaller experimental brews. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Different yeast and different post-boil adjunct might be interesting, but big differences in dry-hopping can make really different beers. Most brewers would like to have your dilemma...too small is usually more of a problem. ;)
     
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  3. Brewer #128484

    Brewer #128484 New Member

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    #3 Brewer #128484, Feb 9, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2018
    Yeah, I thought about pitching different yeast, but I dont think that splitting a 5 gallon batch into 2 five gallon carboys would be good or not with the extra head space. I can only imagine different dry hops in the secondary without oxidation. I’ve been considering 1 gallon stovetop smash brews, but temp control would be an issue with that size container. The thought is to start experimenting and tasting more before committing to a 5 gallon batch. Also saw something about making teas to experiment with different hop flavors. Sorry for the rambling on....
     
  4. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    2.5 gallons in a 5 gallon carboy will be fine. Brew a little bigger and start with around 3 gallons per batch. That'll give you a solid 2.5 gallons of clean beer off the trub. I'd definitely try some different yeast and hop combinations. Go right into the primary with the dry hop. Many hops do extremely well when added at yeast pitch.
    PS...when you say that 5 gallons is the smallest you can make, is it because it's electric and the element will run dry with less?
     
  5. Brewer #128484

    Brewer #128484 New Member

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    Yes, in the process of putting together a herms and I don’t want to purchase smaller carboys when I already have about ten 5 gallon carboys leftover from wine making.
     
  6. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    you can also add pureed fruit to fermentor as well like mango / pasionfruit / pineapple/ lemon zest / orange peel. spices like coriander or star anise.
     
  7. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    They'll be fine for 2.5 to 3 gallon batches. I've done 3-4 gallon batches in my big 6.5 gallon carboys to start a yeast cake for a bigger brew. no problem at all.
     
  8. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    Keep in mind that the carboy's are fine as a fermentor as the oxygen will be replaced/ consumed during active fermentation. It would be problematic if you tried to secondary into another one though.
    So as long as you leave it in the carboy until you're ready to keg, you'll be fine.
    Cheers,
    Brian
     

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