Bourbon woodchips dry hop

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Normballs, Oct 22, 2018.

  1. Normballs

    Normballs New Member

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    I'm planning on dry hopping a stout with woodchips from a bourbon barrel.
    I want to let the stout sit in the carboy for at least a month,
    Now when do I put the chips in, And for how long?
     
  2. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    I'd rack into a secondary once fermentation is done then let the chips sit for at least 2 weeks.
    How much longer is up to your taste. Sample every week or so and package it when you like it
    I know you didn't ask about it, but how are you planning to put the chips in?
     
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  3. Normballs

    Normballs New Member

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    I plan on putting them in a Muslim bag
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I didn't know they made those.... And this could go south very quickly.
     
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  5. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Assuming you meant muslin bag remember to weight it down with sanitized marbles so the chips are fully submerged
     
  6. Normballs

    Normballs New Member

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    Yes thanks, and yes lol muslin bag.
     
  7. JS

    JS New Member

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    I take the bourbon chips and soak them in Makers Mark for two weeks prior to tossing them into the primary (conical). After secondary I add a fresh batch of chips soaked in Makers for an additional 3-4 weeks of oaky bourbony goodness. After 4 or 5 months in the keg or bottle I start to get vanilla which makes for a tasty bonus.
     
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  8. Normballs

    Normballs New Member

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    That sounds great JS, I think I will soak the chips for a couple of weeks, then add them to the secondary, and let it sit for a month or 2.
    I was thinking of using about 14 grams. Is that to little or to much?
     
  9. JS

    JS New Member

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    #9 JS, Oct 26, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2018
    For a 12 gallon batch I use 4 oz of chips soaked in enough makers mark to cover all of the chips. I pour the chips through a strainer and start the second batch soaking and take the strained chips and add to primary. When I rack from the conical to the aging vessel I add the second batch of 4 oz of chips bourbon and all. I do my aging in this:
    http://shop.greatfermentations.com/...MI9YSKp4Wj3gIVDbCzCh15eABpEAQYBCABEgK9GfD_BwE

    For the variable capacity, I skipped the included air lock and switched to a bung. I have two and use them for finishing 12 gal wine batches.

    The valve at the bottom is excellent for sampling. This makes an exceedingly bourbony stout (they way I like it).

    The chips come packaged in 4 oz packages: https://www.homebrewing.org/Whisky-...MIqJvXkIaj3gIVg1YNCh3eBgaMEAQYAiABEgKuzfD_BwE

    For a 5 gal batch you can get away with 1/2 of the package in primary/secondary and 1/2 in aging. If you are racking off of your primary you should be good with using the second 1/2 package through secondary and aging.

    This method is competitive with commercially produced barrel aged stouts. My beer snob friends are blown away when I tell them that I don't age in a barrel. After reading Extreme Brewing from the Dogfish Head founder, one of the many tips I garnered from the book is that chips free floating in the ferment is a good thing.

    ETA: your original question was 14 grams. I'm using 56 grams (2 oz) but I like a bourbony stout. The amount of chips that you use depends upon your taste.
     
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