Bottle Priming

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by MFTIC, Apr 4, 2019.

  1. MFTIC

    MFTIC Active Member

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    Can someone explain or better yet give me comparables for different Volumes of Co2? Honestly i'm not sure what i'm looking for.


    I usually shoot for the low end of volumes because i've gotten gushers from 2 batches were i used the full 5 oz corn sugar. Admittedly one of them was on 3 gallons but the other was on 5 gallons.
    Is there a big difference between 2.2 and 2.7? Assuming everything else is equal.

    Also i have used 3oz corn sugar in 3 separate batches/recipes and gotten 3 different outcomes
    This last batch is the Simcoe one. It's just a little bit flat. Used 3oz corn sugar on 5 gallons at 68deg F.
    Just afraid if i go the full 5oz like the calculator says i'll get gushers again.

    *man i really want to go to kegs so i don't have to deal with this, LOL.
     
  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Gushers aren't that likely under 3 volumes. I used to end up with just under an ounce per gallon when bottle priming. Try the 5 and see how you like it. The only real problem is that it's likely to be a little soda-poppy when you pour it.
    One thing that you have to be aware of is that the volume of actual beer in your bottling bucket. If you're confident of your beer volume and temperature, the calculator will steer you right.
    I'd shoot for 2.5 volumes of CO2 for most basic beers, 2.3 or so for styles that want less fizz.
     
  3. MFTIC

    MFTIC Active Member

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    Alright. I guess I know this, just not working like I thought.
    Had problems estimating beer volume in the beginning, but got that figured out (most of the time, lol)

    *I haven't repeated a recipe yet because i like to try different ones. Guess i need to start brewing smaller batches?
     
    J A likes this.
  4. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    I'm the same I like a lot of different beers, but to become good at your craft you need to brew the same beer the number of times when it starts tasting the same every time, you know you're getting there! What is kind of crucial is to know that you've got a good recipe to start with.
     
  5. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    It's kind of like steak, you can take a great steak and ruin it by the way you cook it if you don't have a good steak ain't no way you're going to cook it good!
     
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I really learned how to brew well by brewing nothing but Helles for a whole summer. By the end of the process, I knew what my process was doing, how to modify it, when to use one procedure over another. I highly recommend brewing one style only for a while, preferably something fizzy and yellow, to really get your process down.
     
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  7. MFTIC

    MFTIC Active Member

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    Yeah, I agree with pretty much everything. Have a couple hurdles. Need a freezer so I can brew more than in the winter months. Everytime I find the perfect one there is a lineup of people waiting to buy it. Also I guess I need to start brewing 3 gallon batches instead of 5. Then I could brew the same recipe and suppliment with store bought for the variety.
     
    Mark Farrall likes this.

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