Blond, Cali Common and a SMaSH

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Shaka, Jul 14, 2020.

  1. Shaka

    Shaka New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2020
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hey guys,

    Muddled together some recipes from briefly reading online and some divine inspiration. Let me know what you think, the one I'm the most excited about is the Blond, as I've just been introduced to Belgians. I brew around 5L stovetop due to size and space but have a fridge to control the fermentation temp. Here are the recipes: (excuse to inexcusable puns)

    Belgian Blond: https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/1024085/leff-t-e-to-my-own-devices

    Cali Common: https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/976149/common-as-mud

    Chinook/Golden Promise SMaSH: https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/1024252/taking-it-on-the-chin-chinook-smash-
     
  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,476
    Likes Received:
    2,694
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    They all look fine. Here's a few thoughts:
    Blonde - no reason for the wheat but if you do a decent protein rest, it can add some head retention for that nice Belgian "foam cloud".
    Cali - 50 is a little dark and 13% is a little high. It'll work as is, but I'd be tempted to stick with about 10% of C-40 for best flavor.
    Smash - It'll be good but it's gonna be good and piney, so I hope that's what you're looking for. I might be tempted to up the gravity and late IBUs and make it an IPA rather than a Pale. That's just my preference for pales being a little more fruit-hopped and saving the heavy-pine hops for big, dank Northwest IPAs and DIPAs and Amber Ales. :)
    Good luck. ;)
     
    Sunfire96 and Shaka like this.
  3. Shaka

    Shaka New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2020
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Cheers thank you! I've never done a protein rest before. Palmer says between 50-55C (120-130 F) for 20-30 minutes. Does this sound plausible? Would I dough in first at this lower temp, and then raise it up to my mash temp (66 C, 150 F) using boiling water and then proceed as normal from then?

    I might change it to an IPA then! I've just got some spare hops around, with chinook being one of them. I'm still new to brewing so want to taste for myself what they taste like, so if it's piney I think it makes sense for higher ABV!
     
    J A likes this.
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,415
    Likes Received:
    6,662
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    I usually dough in at 122 degrees F, then ramp the temperature up to saccarification (144 degrees F, if I'm doing multi-step mashes). If you're working with infusions (boiling water), bypass 144 and go straight to 152 degrees F to keep your volumes down.
     
  5. Shaka

    Shaka New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2020
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    It is possible for me to raise the mash temp without adding boiling water, just slightly worried as I've just moved flat and it's got a gas stove, wouldn't want to scorch the grain when raising the temp!

    So if I were to do the multi-step mash and increase temp. using my stove, would how long would I hold at each temp? I understand it may be down to preference, experience with your own brew setup etc... But have you got a ballpark idea?
     
  6. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,476
    Likes Received:
    2,694
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    Honestly, for a small volume set up, just do a single infusion and don't worry about it. If you have a little haze in your Blonde, nobody's going to care. And malted wheat tends to stay pretty clean anyway. If you're really concerned about a clear beer, just leave the wheat out.
    Keep it simple and concentrate on clean fermentation.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white