Best yeast strains for spunding/capping?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by J A, Nov 15, 2018.

  1. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,476
    Likes Received:
    2,694
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    Who's using any sort of spunding/pressure fermentation and what sort of yeasts have you had experience with? I know that some Belgian strains want to stall with pressure but I've been read about spunding to full pressure with a number of different yeasts and they seem to do fine.


    I'm closing off my Unitank on day 3 of a 1/2 barrel batch using a combination of S-04 and Nottingham (didn't really trust the S-04 slurry so I pitched an additional packet of Notty). I didn't sample right at the time I capped the tank, but based on my last sample, it should be 2-3 points away from FG.
     
  2. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    961
    Likes Received:
    578
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Mentor, Ohio
    The only 1 I've had any trouble with has been WLP002. I think it's just a lazy yeast though and capped early enough would likely be fine.
     
    J A likes this.
  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,476
    Likes Received:
    2,694
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    Some sub charts list S-04 as a interchangeable with WLP002 but most charts don't list a direct match for it. I think it's definitely somewhat different. The high floculation is the characteristic that makes it want to stall and that seems to happen without pressure. Since I pitched Notty along with the S-04 slurry as an assurance, I've got plenty of drop-like-a-rock potential.
    I sampled yesterday and it seems to be at target FG with higher than average attenuation. I'd be surprised if it went any further but the Nottingham is probably responsible for an extra point or two and it could bump down another notch before it's done.
     
  4. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    961
    Likes Received:
    578
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Mentor, Ohio
    #4 The Brew Mentor, Nov 17, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2018
    My experience with Safale-04 is less than favorable. And i'd say considerably different than WLP002.
    It seems like it takes forever to clean up.
    It's been a number of years since I used it last and told myself never again.
    I just did a Best Bitter last Saturday with 2nd Gen 002, fermented @ 65, 2 day D rest and I would have kegged it today for serving the 1st part of next week, but I just ran out of time.
    OG 1.045
    FG 1.012
    Super clean and clear in under 1 week.
    If I did that beer on S-04, It'd be a month before it tasted right.
    Cheers,
    Brian
     
  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,476
    Likes Received:
    2,694
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I've had esters take a while to clear on the first pitch S-04, and had sort of similar with Nottingham but the current beer is pretty clean, even as it's just starting to finish up and drop. I'll start looking at some liquid versions of the English yeasts, but I'm leery based on some beers that I know were done with some of the WLP English yeasts and were pretty heavy on the diacetyl. I'd rather lager an ester-y beer than drink anything with a substantial dose of diacetyl. :)
     
    The Brew Mentor likes this.
  6. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    961
    Likes Received:
    578
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Mentor, Ohio
    I use WLP002, WLP005 and WLP013 in my English beers.
    If I'm making a Beer that I'm concerned about Diacetyl, I have blended them and that seems to work.
    I like the 002/013 blend a lot.
    I like the 002 in the "smaller" English beers and the 013 in my Porters and Stouts.
    Give them a try, I doubt you'll go back to dry.
    Cheers,
    Brian
     
    Hawkbox and J A like this.

Share This Page

arrow_white