belgian ferm

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by oliver, Dec 24, 2015.

  1. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

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    OK, i'm on a belgian beer kick lately, and i want to try out brewing more Belgian styles... Here's my concerns, the fermentation temp, i've read with some yeasts that it's good to start fermentation in the mid 60s, and then let it raise to ambient mid 70s over a 2 week period. However, i like to keep my freezer chamber at 60º for all my other ales that we brew.

    What do you guys prefer when doing Belgian styles?? Should i wait and clear out my ferm chamber and get on a belgian binge for a few months?
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    what yeast are you using, their not all the same
     
  3. GernBlanston

    GernBlanston New Member

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    If you want to brew it warm, then just leave it out of the chamber, at room temps.
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Once you take it out of the freezer, buffer temperature swings by putting the fermentor in s water bath.
     
  5. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

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    i wrote in Belgian Witbier, (3944), and my apartment usually always kind of warm, like 77º ambient. you're recommending a water bath?
     
  6. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    all I can say is the warmer you go the more Belgian yeast flavors will show up in your beer, the cooler the less, its up to you....I prefer less but a true Belgian beer needs those yeast flavors so as stated below for the wort not the air, 75 is fine which means 70 air temp max in my opinion

    YEAST STRAIN: 3944 | Belgian Witbier™

    From the Wyeast page
    This versatile witbier yeast strain can be used in a variety of Belgian style ales. This strain produces a complex flavor profile dominated by spicy phenolics with low to moderate ester production. It is a great strain choice when you want a delicate clove profile not to be overshadowed by esters. It will ferment fairly dry with a slightly tart finish that compliments the use of oats, malted and unmalted wheat. This strain is a true top cropping yeast requiring full fermenter headspace of 33%.

    Origin:
    Flocculation: Medium
    Attenuation: 72-76%
    Temperature Range: 62-75F, 16-24C
    Alcohol Tolerance: 11 to12% ABV
     
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    If the temperature isn't constant, then you need to buffer the temperature swings.
     

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