Attenuation 55% Please...

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by ACBEV, Dec 3, 2017.

  1. ACBEV

    ACBEV Active Member

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    I know, I should know, but I'm a bit thick!

    I need an expert (think one comes here sometimes), who can tell me the best way to put the hand brake on.

    Honest I can make good beer, I'm very good with my equipment and am very precise with my brewing. Meat goes in one end and sausages come out the other.

    Will I need a hydrometer? (I don't use one) :D

    In the holidays I'm planning on brewing Hardy Ale, OG 1.121 according to the recipe calc (75% Efficiency), I suspect efficiency would be nearer 80%. I'd like to stop at 1.050.

    Normally I let things take its natural process and all works well.
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Yes to hydrometer and no to 1.125 or whatever that is rocket fuel ha ha. Youll probably need some DME at that gravity.
     
  3. ACBEV

    ACBEV Active Member

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    Ok I've been playing with recipe calc... Now down to OG 1.112 FG 1.048. if I can get to 55% attenuation! I don't want to modify grain too much if I can avoid it.
     
  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    first you’re going to need more than 4 packs of yeast for that brew, and it’s probably going to need plenty of head space and blow the top off, I would ferment that in 2 half full fermenters, as far as stopping thats a hard thing to do especially without knowing the gravity, most yeast will drown them self and go dormant anyway from too much alcohol, I would pick a high flocculating yeast they should replicate big then flock too much and trap then selves anyway even without measuring
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I'm not understanding your intention. As mentioned above, an OG of 1.12 is rocket fuel, not beer. It will generate enough alcohol to kill the yeast at some point. If you want to stop the fermentation (I don't recommend it), you'll want to use metabisulfite and potassium sorbate but why? That's the part I'm not getting.
     
  6. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    #6 HighVoltageMan!, Dec 3, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2017
    I recently made a barley wine to blend into another beer (a RIS that was too roasty and dry). The starting gravity was 1.127, the finish was around the 1.045. I used 3 packs of 34/70 and fermented at 53 F. It was a 3 gallon batch and was not bad at all. Surprisingly smooth and not hot.

    If you mash high (158 F) and use more crystal malt you can lower attenuation. The yeast are going to attenuate a little less because the high SG.
    If you aerate the daylights out of it and pitch a s$&@ load of yeast, ferment at a low temp, you avoid the rocket fuel, but I doubt it would be ready any time soon. Big beers like that need some time, but what the heck, give it a whirl.
     
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  7. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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    How big is your mash tun ? You'll struggle mashing enough malt to hit that sort of gravity in most cases since mash efficiency drops pretty quickly over 1.080 .
    You can do an extra long boil to concentrate your wort or just top up with dry / liquid malt .
    Cold side on that beer will be a nightmare
     
  8. ACBEV

    ACBEV Active Member

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    I'm a jekyll and hyde brewer. Mostly I'm happy to brew up English staples like Bitter, Mild, Light Ale, Stout ect...

    But sometimes I see something I'd like to try. Even with limited equipment.

    So in this case I'd like to brew Thomas Hardy Ale, first brewed by Eldridge Pope in 1967...
    Here are the numbers and ingredients of beer brewed in 1967...

    OG 1.110
    FG 1.048
    ABV 8.4%
    Attenuation 55%
    IBU 84
    SRM 14
    EBC 29
    60% Pale Malt
    23% Lager Malt
    5% Crystal Malt
    12% Flaked Wheat
    Goldings 68bu 90 mins
    Styrian Goldings 16bu 30 mins

    Point taken about mash tun size, but I could go half by normal batch size...
     
  9. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    That can be done. I have made beers over 1.100 but it's not the easiest, although they turned out very good. My mash tun is 15 gallon (60 liter) and I able to put @ 25 pounds in it. The mash efficiency will drop, so take that into account. You will need a LOT of yeast, so either make a a very large starter or make a smaller beer and pitch on the yeast cake of the smaller beer. You will need to aerate with pure oxygen if possible (welding O2 works fine), agitating might work, but O2 is the best. Very big beers like that will heat up during fermentation more than lower gravity beers, so pitch cool and ferment cool (60 F or lower). It will puke out of the fermenter, so either be prepared for beer losses or make a smaller batch to give you lots of room in the fermenter.

    Every thing seems to be pointing to making a small batch of this to make things easier. A 3 gallon batch would be easier than a 5 gallon, that's for sure.

    I say go for it, that beer sounds like fun.
     
  10. ACBEV

    ACBEV Active Member

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    Thanks for the advice...

    I've replaced the lager malt with two cans of Muntons extra light liquid malt, which brings down the grain weight to 6kg for mashing.

    I'm giving up in trying to limit attenuation and will mash at 70c, instead of 65c. Also will use a lower attenuation yeast.

    By my calculations (Guesses) the beer will be ready for drinking in 9 months. I do hope its worth the effort!

    For anyone who can be bothered to look, here is the recipe...
    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/576227/hardy-ale
     
  11. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    be car full using the liquid, it can go strait to the bottom stick and burn, been there many times :eek:
     
  12. ACBEV

    ACBEV Active Member

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    Lol... Done it myself before... More than once too... I will mix 50/50 with hot wort before putting in...
     

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